Please see our player page for David Fletcher to see projections for today, the next 7 days and rest of season as well as stats and gamelogs designed with the fantasy baseball player in mind.

With the top 20 3rd basemen for 2020 fantasy baseball, we’ve gone through the infield, we can see how deep each position was in the most undeepest (totally a word!) of seasons. 1st base was deep. Oddly so since coming into this year (and last), it felt like 1st base was not as deep as it had been going back two or three years. The guard has changed, and 1st base was deep again. At least in a two-month season. Next up, shortstops and 3rd basemen were equally deep on the backend — Willi Castro was exactly the 20th ranked for both. However, shortstops were far and away deeper up top, and it wasn’t close. Didi Gregorius, the 10th ranked shortstop, was worth about twice as much as the 10th ranked 3rd baseman, and Didi was way more valuable than the 10th ranked 1st baseman. Finally, 2nd basemen were easily the worst infield position outside of catchers. So, infield ranked from deepest to shallowest in the undeepest of seasons: 1B, SS, 3B, 2B, and catchers. However, ranking the top 10 of each position: SS, 1B, 3B, 2B, catchers. With SS and 1B, 1A and 1B. That’s not confusing at all. I’ll begin outfield tomorrow, they are the deepest in the undeepest. To recap my recap before the recap, this final ranking is from our Fantasy Baseball Player Rater with my comments. This is not for next year. Anyway, here’s the top 20 3rd basemen for 2020 fantasy baseball and how they compare to where I originally ranked them:

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As terrible as the 2nd basemen were, the top 20 shortstops for 2020 fantasy baseball were that good. Just absolute nails, and not like the Nails interview Donkey Teeth and I did with Lenny Dykstra on our Patreon podcast (it’s $5/month; the price of one fancy coffee if you’re in a non-fancy coffee shop) where Nails is having sex while talking to us, but nails like nails nails. These guys could make a difference for your fantasy team. From the top, until, well, they fall off at a certain point. We’ll get there. To recap my recap before the recap, this final ranking is from our Fantasy Baseball Player Rater with my comments. This is not for next year. Anyway, here’s the top 20 shortstops for 2020 fantasy baseball and how they compared to where I originally ranked them:

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2nd basemen in 2020 were a lot like the year 2020, in general. A complete shizzshow.Wilmer Flores was a top five 2nd baseman. That is not a compliment to Wilmer Flores, but a slap in the face of all 2nd basemen. That’s Wilmer Flores taking off his white glove and smacking every other 2nd baseman across the face. Then, as the 2nd basemen place their hand on their cheek, shocked they were smacked and disrespected, Jeff McNeil, who wasn’t even a top 20 2nd baseman, comes along and urinates on their shoe. To recap my recap before the recap, this final top 20 2nd basemen for 2020 fantasy baseball ranking is from our Fantasy Baseball Player Rater with my comments. This is not for next year. Anyway, here’s the top 20 2nd basemen for 2020 fantasy baseball and how they compared to where I originally ranked them:

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As an Angeleno, I can’t tell you how amazing it’s been to be able to watch Clayton Kershaw every 5th game for all of his 2,500 Ks. I kid, games are blacked out here, and I’ve only seen him in the playoffs. Is he good? Really? Can you describe what he looks like when he’s good? He’s a lefty? A good slider? Are you messing with me? I can’t tell. *opening up Kershaw’s player page* Wow, I feel like I might’ve missed something by never seeing him pitch in a regular season game. Geez. Yesterday, Clayton Kershaw (6 IP, 0 ER, 1 hit, 2 walks, 8 Ks, ERA at 1.50) recorded his 2500th strikeout and he seems likely to avoid the Doom of F-Her, where he disappears in his 30s, and ruins his Hall of Fame candidacy. Forget that, actually, Kershaw could win the NL Cy this year for old time’s sake. Be kinda awesome to see him collect the award before Game 4 of the World Series, then goes out and gives up seven earned in the 1st inning, eliminating the Dodgers. Anyway, here’s what else I saw yesterday in fantasy baseball:

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As the 2020 season turns there’s plenty of ongoing changes in the Top 100. Things are very very good for some players, and bad and getting worse for others. Six players have left the list which means six have jumped on. #80 Jonathan Schoop, #85 Pedro Severino, #89 Austin Nola, #90 Renato Nunez, welcome back #92 Eugenio Suarez and #99 Kyle Tucker. These guys are obviously killing it in various degrees of goodness. In particular perhaps it’s time to take Baltimore seriously. With all those Yankee injuries, and all the great performances by various Orioles, it’s no wonder the Rays are looking to be active in the trade market. Those dropping off include Mike Moustakas, Ramon Laureano, Eduardo Escobar, Gleyber Torres and unfortunately Josh Bell. I have defended several of these players recently but their struggles, and the good play by so many others, have made these moves inevitable. As Suarez shows, a week or two of good play can make all the difference. You can find last week’s list here. Now on to the details for some of the movers this week.

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Greetings, my excellent friends. I think it’s time we face the music. This year of fantasy baseball has not been an excellent adventure. Not by any means. As one wise dude once said “strange things are afoot at the Circle K”. Honestly if it’s not COVID-19, it’s a blister, paternity leave, explosive diarrhea, in-climate weather or protest that has derailed my weekly lineups. I pled with my league to switch from weekly lineups to daily for this year, but they huffed and they puffed and they blew the league up. I think I said it last week, the teams that win the championships in their respective leagues this year are not going to be the best teams, they are going to be the ones that got the luckiest when it came to navigating players not playing. I’m glad we got a season in, but this season is in danger of flunking most heinously.

What do Trevor Story, Kyle Seager, David Fletcher, Yuli Gurriel all have in common? I’m guess they probably have a handful of stuff in common, but the thing to which I am referring is the fact they have all scored double digit points every week this season.

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When the Padres are in Colorado finding some value in a starting pitcher is essential to get as many high priced bats in your FanDuel lineup as possible. In this case the needle points to Trevor Cahill ($7,000). In this season m/ore than ever it’s about what have you done for me lately. In Cahill’s case he just scored 37 points against these same Diamondbacks on 8/23. He’s stretched out and likely to go at least five, which is more than you can say for most of the pitchers. And sure, you could attempt to go with Bundy at more thank $2K more but then be left to pick up the riskier pieces for most of your lineup. One extra nugget on this game in Cahill’s favor: Eduardo Escobar has two homers in four at bats against Cahill in the past but is badly slumping to a .184 batting average. This is one area you can find some value on the Main Slate today at FanDuel. Let’s look for a bit more and figure out how to add Tatis and Machado to your lineup. Of the two Machado is much hotter, and look to Boston of all places to perhaps zag while others stick with the Padres and Rockies. More on that in the “Doing Lines In Vegas” area. Sometimes those lines can make you $$$.

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There are times in life when one is right, and times when one is wrong. I realized over the past week that this list has been much more 162 than 60. We have passed a third of the season and one thing has become apparent above all: The changes implemented by MLB and teams have not affected everyone equally. Some have thrived, others have wilted. A big part of this list was the theory that a short season would help the older players. For the most part, this has not happened. So gentle readers, the electronic tones of LCD Soundsystem to you. I can change.

There is so much change in this list from last time we’re more or less starting over. There are no previous rankings or plus or minus this week because 15% of the list changed in one week. Pour one out for the 15 who are gone. We’re looking to the future, and a new Number 1.

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Does anyone know if Dylan is related to King Kong? Any 80s WWF fans in the house? Notice I said WWF and not WWE. We’re going back before they were told to get the “F” out. King Kong Bundy and his big splashes was a classic in old school wrestling. I remember watching him fight Hogan in a steel cage match. But fast forward about thirty-five years and it’s Dylan Bundy who’s making a splash. In 28.2 innings pitched (4 starts) he has 35 strikeouts and just 3 base on balls. In points leagues lingo that translates into just over 27 points per start. I laugh at your small sample size suggestion.

The top starting pitcher in points leagues with about 33 points per starts is Trevor Bauer. Right behind him is Shane Bieber with 28.75 points per start. Bieber, Bauer and Bundy. That sounds like a law firm or a boy band. If you happen to own all three of those guys you have got to be flying high right about now. And considering their ADPs (Bieber 24, Bauer 58, Bundy 178), it was quite possible for you have drafted them. As a point of reference here are the points per start numbers for some known aces.

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Now that the 2020 MLB season has hit the three-week mark, we’re at the point where we can start looking into some sell-high and buy-low candidates. With sample sizes increasing from the “far-too-small” to the increasingly indicative, we begin to ask ourselves questions like: “is Dylan Bundy actually good now, or are hitters just being thrown off by his dusty, pathetic attempt at facial hair?”  Translation: are the results we’re seeing legitimate? If you’re willing to make a calculated gamble, this is as good of a time as any to find excess value in the trade market and/or dump an early star destined for decline to the league dingus. One such player I’m looking at adding shares of at present is Eduardo Escobar of the Arizona Diamondbacks, who entered the week of Aug. 10 batting .164/.233/.255 with just two extra base hits across his first 55 at bats of the season. After finishing draft season with an ADP of 113 overall as 2B13/3B17, Escobar looks to be an obvious bust from the outside looking in — but let me tell you why he’s a major buy-low candidate for me for the rest of the season.

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