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I’m the one man army Ason, I’ve never been tooken out, I keep Prospectors looking out, I drop knowledge like Lancy dropping babies, enough to make an Albright go craaaaaazy! Sorry, always wanted to start a post like that, and I decided it shall be done over my morning coffee. In case you missed it I released the top 50 Prospects for 2018 on Sunday. Funny enough this is the perfect segue to today’s post, the second part of my top 100, this time with even more words! We’re going through 51-100, and I have to say this is by far the most difficult section of all my prospect rankings. It’s in intersection where up and comers full of helium, mix with droppers, solid-close-to-the-majors types, and super-young pure upside plays. I try to balance them all, and at times tiers dovetail, and weave together more than they stay in any sort of specific order. It’s an inexact science this prospecting. There’s so many unknown variables within each player and each player’s opportunities in a given organization at a given time. Constantly changing and evolving. All this to say that there’s a lot of educated guessing, and there’s bound to be some serious misses. Hello Tyler Glasnow!

51. Jesus Sanchez, OF Rays | Level: A | 2017 Stats: .305/.348/.478, 15 HR, 82 RBI, 7 SB

A future middle of the order bat with batting average and power, sort of your classic corner outfield type. Sanchez has a loose lefty swing, makes consistent contact, and has some ceiling left in his power. Sort of toes the thin line of being a potential impact bat or a 4th or 5th outfielder in a 12 team league. ETA: 2019

52. Mitch Keller, RHP Pirates | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: 7-4, 104.1 IP, 3.02 ERA, 1.03 WHIP, 98 K, 30 Bb

The Pirates top pitching prospect under his limits, Tyler Glasnow is past his, and prolly not the top arm in the Pirates minors any longer. Keller is Glasnow’s near opposite, an elite command and control pitcher, with an above average fastball and a plus curveball. He seems like the type that might miss more bats than you think at peak, like a Jacob deGrom type. ETA: 2019

53. Jorge Mateo, SS Athletics | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: .267/.322/.459, 12 HR, 57 RBI, 52 SB

The elite speed option on the list, Mateo was the major get, sort of, in the Sonny Gray to the Yankees deal. He’s been solid for the Athletics AA affiliate Midland, starting all 30 games at short, while slashing .292/.333/.518. The former Yankee farmhand has 170 steals over the last three seasons, and in my opinion, is the premier speed prospect in the minors. The power has started to come along this year, producing the best ISO of his career at .192. Mateo will never win a batting title or bat .300, but he has the ability to produce 40+ steals with 15 homer pop. ETA: 2019

54. Miguel Andujar, 3B Yankees | 2017 Level: AAA | .315/.352/.498, 16 HR, 82 RBI, 5 SB

Controlled violence is the best way to describe Andujar’s swing. Witnessing his batting practice exploits first hand, massive raw power and bat speed are very present. Unfortunately he doesn’t always tap into his raw power in games due to a rather flat, maybe even downward sloping bat path. He’s continued to limit strikeouts and hit for a high amount of contact at every level. And there’s reason to believe he could make the right adjustments to draw more from his raw power in games. Should be up in the Bronx within the next few weeks, with an outside shot of breaking camp as the starter, that’s if he’s not dealt over the offseason. Should stick at third long term, and develop into an above average fielder at peak. ETA: 2018

55. Jack Flaherty, RHP Cardinals | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: 14-4, 148.2 IP, 2.18 ERA, 1.04 WHIP, 147 K, 35 Bb

Flaherty is an elite control and command starter that misses enough bats to have top 20 fantasy starter upside. His fastball-changeup combo, and elite control play up his other offerings. He struggled in his first taste of the majors, but that’s common for a starter so young. In fact Sunday was Flaherty’s 22nd birthday. Looks like a number 3 starter with the upside to be a 2. ETA: 2018

56. Keston Hiura, 2B Brewers | Level: A | 2017 Stats: .371/.422/.611, 4 HR, 33 RBI, 2 SB

Ranking 85th in my midseason top 100, Hiura has been solid through his first half a season of pro-ball. He’s just returned to the field recently, playing 3 games at second at the end of the season, and has done the same in fall instructs. If you’re unaware of Hiura’s elbow injury do some googling. Hiura was one of the best college bats from the 2017 draft, pairing excellent contact, with plus approach, and above average power. If he can tap into more of his raw power, then Hiura has a chance to be a stud fantasy player. If he doesn’t he’ll be similar to later career Dustin Pedoria with a little more pop. When it comes to first year player drafts he should be going well within the top 5-10 picks. ETA: 2019

57. Willy Adames, SS Rays | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: .277/.360/.415, 10 HR, 62 RBI, 11 SB

With a full year of solid, but unspectacular production at AAA Durham, I can see how you could go either way with Adames. Some will feel he’s underrated, while others will feel he’s overrated. I’m more the former than the latter. It’s obvious when watching Adames that he’s a professional hitter with no glaring weakness. Much like Gleyber he lacks a true category of impact, but to expect similar production to frequently overdrafted Xander Bogaerts isn’t crazy. I think Adames will have his seasons of good but never elite production. Should be up in Tampa in early 2018. ETA: 2018 (duh)

58. Matt Manning, RHP Tigers | Level: A | 2017 Stats: 4-2, 51 IP, 3.18 ERA, 1.29 WHIP, 62 K, 25 Bb

The 19 year old righty is a tall athletic specimen, with a live four-seam fastball, and massive amount of upside. The 9th overall pick in the 2016 draft, spent the first half of 2017 refining his mechanics in extended spring training. As should be expected from a player that didn’t fully commit to baseball until his senior year of high school. His arsenal is comprised of a rising high 90’s fastball, a changeup, and a spiked curveball. Manning should see assignment to full season ball out of spring in 2018. Power pitcher with top of the rotation upside here. ETA: 2021

59. Heliot Ramos, OF Giants | Level: Rk | 2017 Stats: .348/.404/.645, 6 HR, 27 RBI, 10 SB

No player from this June’s draft has done more to raise their prospect profile than Ramos. At just 17 years old, Ramos had a dominant showing in Arizona vs older competition. The 19th overall pick generates plus power from his elite bat speed, and pairs it plus speed. Despite the great numbers, Ramos has a ways to go still at the plate, he strikes out too much (31.8%), and was very lucky on balls in play (.500 BABIP). Regardless this is a supremely talented player. ETA: 2021

60. Franklin Barreto, SS Athletics | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: .290/.339/.456, 15 HR, 54 RBI, 15 SB

I go hot and cold with Barreto, and after more study of his game, I’m far less optimistic than I’ve been in the past. Here’s why, he has major contact issues, his speed is either under-utilized (A’s problem for Mateo too) or diminishing, his power is there, but only above average not a difference maker, and I’m not sure how long he is for short. His value decreases significantly as an outfielder. I know, I’m contradicting my opening. I worry we might be looking at a .240/17/10 guy, and that’s just not enough to be the difference maker we’ve been hoping for. ETA: 2018

61. Ryan Mountcastle, SS Orioles | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: .287/.312/.489, 18 HR, 62 RBI, 8 SB

The Orioles top middle infield prospect and 2015 first rounder in many ways is representative of the Orioles recent prospect profile. He’s a talented contact hitter, with little approach, and plus power. Between he and Austin Hays they have two players whose skills should play in 5×5 roto formats, but will take a hit in points, OBP, and OPS leagues. Unlikely to stick at short long term, many feel his future lies in a corner outfield spot, but in 2017 he’s split time between short and third. ETA: 2019

62. Alec Hansen, RHP White Sox | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: 11-8, 141.1 IP, 2.80 ERA, 1.17 WHIP, 191 K, 51 Bb

Hansen is proof that a bad final year of college might tank your draft stock, but isn’t indicative of future struggles. The 22 year old righthander led all of minor league baseball in strikeouts this year, and jumped across three levels of full season ball. He didn’t slow down against better competition either, ending his year in AA Birmingham striking out 82 batters in 58.1 innings. Hansen has top of the rotation upside. ETA: 2019

63. Starling Heredia, OF Dodgers | Level: A | 2017 Stats: .325/.397/.555, 7 HR, 34 RBI, 10 SB

Signed for $2.6 million back in 2015, Heredia at 19 broke out big in 2017. Built like a pit bull, Heredia is big bodied but muscular, and it manifests itself in his plus plus raw power. He showed no trouble getting to it in games, and improved his pitch recognition as the season progressed. Another player to invest in now. ETA: 2020

64. Zack Collins, C White Sox | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: .224/.370/.445, 19 HR, 53 RBI, 0 SB

Collins is easy to break down; power, on base, strikeouts. He’s the penultimate three outcome hitter, walking at an elite rate, but struggling to hit above .240. There’s 25-30 homer seasons in his bat, and he should get a huge boost in leagues that use OBP in place of average. Collins has done well to hone his catching skills and looks likely to stick behind the plate for now. ETA: 2019

65. Jhailyn Ortiz, OF Phillies | Level: A | 2017 Stats: .302/.401/.560, 8 HR, 30 RBI, 5 SB

Massive power, that’s where any discussion of the 18 year old Ortiz begins. Now that I have your attention, allow me to further endear Jhailyn to you. Not only does Ortiz have massive raw power, he pairs it with an extremely advanced approach for an 18 year old. He has the bat speed to turn on any fastball, and constantly makes pitchers pay for leaving pitches over the heart of the plate. All fields power, advanced approach, and sneaky athleticism make Ortiz one of the top up and comers to buy low on in dynasty. ETA: 2020

66. Brandon Marsh, OF Angels | Level: Rk | 2017 Stats: .350/.396/.548, 4 HR, 44 RBI, 10 SB

Since being taken 60th overall in the 2016 draft Marsh has played just 39 professional games, all coming this year. But in the games he has played in, Marsh has been phenomenal. I believe we’re looking a fantasy superstar in the making, and I’ve ranked him as such twice now. ETA: 2020

67. Franklin Perez, RHP Tigers | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: 6-3, 86.1 IP, 3.02 ERA, 1.14 WHIP, 78 K, 27 Bb

The centerpiece of the deal that sent Justin Verlander to the Astros, Perez is a supremely talented 19 year old, who is just the latest in a long line of top notch prospects from Houston’s development machine. While he has no true plus offering, he does have plus command of a quartet of above average pitches (four-seam, changeup, slider, and curveball). The combination of pitchability, and a deep arsenal give Perez front of the rotation upside. ETA: 2019

68. Colton Welker, 3B Rockies | 2017 Level: A | 2017 Stats: .350/.401/.500, 6 HR, 33 RBI, 5 SB

Ranking 67th on my Mid-season top 100 list, a groin injury caused him to miss 2 and half months of the season. Effectively stealing the second half of Welker’s 2017. A rare mix of contact and power make Welker yet another potential elite bat in Colorado’s system. He’s still just 19, and there’s a chance he could move off the position, but his upside is as high as anyone on this list not named Guerrero. ETA: 2020

69. Jon Duplantier, RHP Diamondbacks | Level: A+ | 2017 Stats: 12-3, 136 IP, 1.39 ERA, 0.98 WHIP, 165 K, 42 Bb

Following a shoulder injury late in his final season at Rice, Duplantier headed to pro-ball last year, hurt, and in need of a mechanics tweak. The righty spent the off-season refining his delivery, which resulted in a healthy season of domination across both levels of A ball. In fact Duplantier’s 1.39 ERA was the lowest in the minors since Justin Verlander’s 1.29 in 2005. The righty relies on a four pitch mix, led by his low to mid 90’s sinking fastball, plus slider, and above average curveball and changeup offerings. Looks like a mid-rotation arm with strikeout upside. ETA: 2019

70. Brent Rooker, 1B Twins | Level: A+ | 2017 Stats: .281/.364/.566, 18 HR, 52 RBI, 2 SB

Though he was ranked behind players like Pavin Smith and Brendan McKay heading into this June’s draft, Rooker has had arguably the most impressive showing of any player entering pro-ball in 2017. After just 22 games at rookie level Elizabethton Rooker earned promotion to high A Fort Myers of the Florida State League. From there he hit 11 homers in 40 games and slugging .552 splitting time between first and the outfield. There’s 40 homer pop potential in Rooker’s bat, giving me the confidence to aggressively rank him this season. ETA: 2019

71. Ian Anderson, RHP Braves | Level: A | 2017 Stats: 4-5, 83 IP, 3.14 ERA, 1.35 WHIP, 101 K, 43 Bb

The “Aqualung” continued to prove that his selection as the third overall player in the 2016 draft was no bonus slot trickery, but a deserving selection. In his first full year Anderson made 20 starts in the Appy League, mostly coming prior to July, where the Braves slowed down his workload considerably. Not because he was wearing down, but because he was a cold weather pitching arm in his first full pro season. Anderson brings a three pitch mix highlighted by plus offerings in his mid-90’s four seam and a sharp breaking curveball. His changeup is a work i progress, but has received average grades from those that scouted the Sally this season. ETA: 2020

72. Jorge Guzman, RHP Yankees | Level: A | 2017 Stats: 5-3, 66.2 IP, 2.30 ERA, 1.04 WHIP, 88 K, 18 Bb

A part of the Brian McCann trade in the offseason, at the time Guzman was considered a future relief arm with a high octane fastball. In 2017 the righty improved his secondaries and control, and made major strides toward a future in the rotation. He hits 100 on a regular basis, touching 101 and 102 on occasion, and misses tons of bats. It’ll be two years before he makes any impact, but he could be a fantasy stud in the mold of current Yankee Luis Severino. ETA: 2020

73. Adrian Morejon, LHP Padres | Level: A | 2017 Stats: 3-4, 63 IP, 3.86 ERA, 1.29 WHIP, 58 K, 16 Bb

The Padres system is loaded with talent in A ball and below. Morejon would be the top pitching prospect in many organizations, but gets lost in the shuffle behind flashier arms like Michel Baez and MacKenzie Gore. The 18 year old lefty’s pitching IQ is off the charts, he sequences well, changes speeds, and shows touch on all of his pitches. His fastball sits low 90’s with lots of spin and movement, while his curveball, and two variations of his changeup all flash plus at times. The question with Morejon is despite being 18, how much ceiling is there? One would think a player with this pitching ability would only get better, but it doesn’t always work that way. Question aside Morejon is a nice pitching prospect to own for the long term. ETA: 2020

74. Keibert Ruiz, C Dodgers | Level: A+ | 2017 Stats: .316/.361/.452, 8 HR, 51 RBI, 0 SB

A switch hitting contact machine with developing power and plate approach beyond his years. Sound familiar? No, it’s not me catching a temporary stutter, Keibert isn’t all that different from Francisco Mejia a couple of seasons ago. The Dodgers are the type of organization to take it slow, so Ruiz is still a good three years from any regular playing time. But if his recent track record and production is any indicator, then we could be looking at a peak of a .300 average and mid teen to low 20s homer totals. ETA: 2021

75. Wander Javier, SS Twins | Level: Rk | 2017 Stats: .299/.383/.471, 4 HR, 22 RBI, 4 SB

A toolsy shortstop with advanced offensive skills, and likelihood to stick in the middle of the infield. Above average pop, above average speed, and good bat to ball skills make Javier a good investment on the ground floor. Still needs to refine his approach as 49 Ks in 157 at bats ain’t cutting it. ETA: 2021

76. Kyle Wright, RHP Braves | Level: A+ | 2017 Stats: 0-1, 17 IP, 2.65 ERA, 1.00 WHIP, 18 K, 6 Bb

Didn’t pitch a ton after a long college season, but many thought Wright was the best college player in the draft. He has a plus fastball that sits 92-95, with sink, touching 97 when he needs it. His secondaries are led by his plus curveball with nice two plane movement, and an average slider. He should move quick, but in a stocked Braves system just how quickly he ascends is hard to peg. Looks like a sure fire number three with the upside of a number two starter. ETA: 2019

77. Chance Adams, RHP Yankees | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: 15-5, 150.1 IP, 2.45 ERA, 1.08 WHIP, 135 K, 58 Bb

A former fifth round pick, Adams is a converted college reliever who continues to pass each test with flying colors. He mixes a low to mid-90’s fastball with an above average slider, an average curve, and a work in progress changeup. Many see Adams as a mid-rotation type in the mold of Jordan Zimmermann, back when he was good, not now. Doesn’t miss tons of bats, but enough to be relevant, his control and movement play up his fastball. Unfortunately Adams faces the baptism by fire in the AL East. ETA: 2018

78. Edwin Rios, 1B Dodgers | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: .309/.362/.533, 24 HR, 91 RBI, 1 SB

Since being drafted in the 6th round of the 2015 draft Rios has hit 51 homers, driven in 167 runs while slashing .306/.353/.549. So why the hell is he constantly looked over? I get it, he doesn’t look like a ball player, and his skills don’t necessarily translate to scouting grades, but all he’s done is hit across every level of the minors. Seriously every, single, level. All of them. His raw power is huge, and his game power ain’t too shabby, but he doesn’t walk a ton. Rios gets a lot of AAAA labels, but I refuse to completely dismiss a track record that spans 1,000 at bats. A .270/30/80 peak isn’t out of the realm of possibility. ETA: 2018

79. Cal Quantrill, RHP Padres | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: 7-10 , 116 IP, 3.80 ERA, 0.92 WHIP, 110 K, 40 Bb

The numbers are inconsistent, but the most important number for Quantrill this year was the 116 innings pitched. After missing most of his sophomore season all of his junior season at Stanford, there were lots of questions regarding just who Quantrill would be upon returning. What we saw was the same fearless competitor, with a big league fastball, and three secondaries he can throw for strike. The best of his secondaries is his plus changeup, but he also throws two above average breaking balls. If Quantrill is able to further refine his command the further removed he is from surgery, it’s possible he could jump to the big leagues by the end of 2018. ETA: 2019

80. Nick Gordon, SS Twins | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: .270/.341/.408 9 HR, 66 RBI, 13 SB

Unlike his brother Dee, Nick isn’t a speed demon or even a one category superstar. He might be the better all around player than Dee, certainly providing more pop in his bat, but that’s not saying a ton. If Willy Adames is the poor man’s version of Gleyber, then Gordon is the poor man’s version of Adames. He’s a strong all around player that should be fantasy relevant but never a superstar. ETA: 2019

81. Luis Urias, 2B Padres | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: .296/.398/.380, 3 HR, 38 RBI, 7 SB

It’s easy to look at the power numbers and forget that Urias just turned 20 at the beginning of June. While it’s certainly not encouraging, it wouldn’t be surprising if he grew into say 10-13 homer power depending upon how juiced the balls were in a given season. He’s yet another hit tool first prospect, and he doesn’t have elite speed. Not the most exciting player on here, but as good a hitter as any. ETA: 2019

82. Jake Bauers, 1B/OF Rays | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: .263/.368/.412, 13 HR, 63 RBI, 20 SB

After setting the world on fire in spring training many were calling for Bauers to break camp with the Rays. A great season from Logan Morrison, paired with the Rays preference to wait until prospects are 5 years from qualifying for social security before bringing them up, kept Bauers in AAA all year. There’s an excellent chance he’s in the mix at first as early as April, with an outside chance he breaks camp with the club. Superior athleticism, and off the charts baseball IQ make Bauers a sleeper. The best  corner infield baserunner on this list by a wide margin, Jake the Rake offers elite approach, and enough pop to be dangerous. ETA: 2018

83. Lewin Diaz, 1B Twins | Level: A | 2017 Stats: .292/.329/.444, 13 HR, 68 RBI, 2 SB

Diaz is the unusual power first prospect that pairs 70 grade raw power with feel to hit. Much of his early success is rooted in excellent mechanics at the plate, and superior bat control. Diaz is among the most likely to bust out huge in 2018, with the potential to shoot up top 100 lists with a good showing in high A. Might be my favorite Twins hitting prospect not named Royce Lewis. ETA: 2020

84. Dylan Cease, RHP White Sox | Level: A | 2017 Stats: 1-10, 93.1 IP, 3.28 ERA, 1.26 WHIP, 126 K, 44 Bb

Hi Vito… I have a leaguemate that’s got a major hard-on for Cease, every year he reads my Top 100, and says Cease should be higher. That said, it’s tough to love Cease. At one point not too long ago, I thought he had one of the highest upsides in the minors. But too many injuries, and some serious mechanics concerns leave it a better than 50/50 shot he ends up in the pen. His pure stuff is as good as any one, mixing a nasty high 90’s fastball with sink, a hammer curve, and a fringy change. The command and control are inconsistent, and at times downright bad. Despite missing time with an ankle injury, Cease stayed mostly healthy avoiding any arm related flare ups. ETA: 2019

85. Corbin Burnes, RHP Brewers | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: 8-3, 145.2 IP, 1.67 ERA, 0.95 WHIP, 140 K, 36 Bb

What Burnes lacks in elite stuff, he makes up for with command, and the balls to challenge hitters. His fastball sits low 90’s with movement, while his slider is the only truly plus offering in his repertoire, that also consists of a curveball, and a split-change. The numbers look truly phenomenal, up next the Colorado Springs challenge. Being a AAA starter for the Brewers is like surviving the final challenge in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. ETA: 2018

86. Peter Alonso, 1B Mets | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: .289/.359/.524, 18 HR, 63 RBI, 3 SB

Despite breaking his hand in the first two weeks of the season, and missing most of April and May, Alonso returned with a vengeance. A player highly touted by both Halp and myself following the draft and into the offseason, Alonso is often ignored by top prospect lists. But don’t get it twisted homeboy can hit. After mashing in the Florida State League for three months (not an easy feat), Alonso finished the season off in AA Binghamton, slugging .578 in 11 games. He’s a righthanded hitting first baseman, and that gets some people in a tizzie. Rhys Hoskins laughs at those people. I really like Alonso’s mix of power and contact ability, as he rarely strikes out, and still maintains .500+ slugging percentages. One knock on Alonso is he doesn’t walk much, ultimately limiting his OPS and batting average potential. But there’s 30 homer pop in that bat, and he has no split issues, absolutely mashing vs lefties. ETA: 2019

87. Brian Anderson, 3B Marlins | 2017 Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: .275/.361/.492, 22 HR, 81 RBI, 1 SB

After two and half years of moderate power and production, Anderson tapped into his raw power in 2017, riding it to a late season callup. I see the Marlins top hitting prospect as a high floor player that could produce solid fantasy seasons in deeper leagues of 16 teams plus. Long term I’d expect a line of .270, 20 HR, 75 RBI at peak, with maybe a little more batting average upside than power. Should be a factor in Miami in 2018. ETA: 2018 (duh)

88. Nick Pratto, 1B Royals | Level: Rk | 2017 Stats: .247/.330/.414, 4 HR, 34 RBI, 10 SB

It’s not often that a first base only prep player goes in the first round, let alone the first 15 picks in the draft, but that’s the case with the Royals Nick Pratto. He ranked 184 on my mid-season top 200, and 12th overall in my pre-draft prospect rankings. The former California prep star has loose wrists, all fields power, and feel to hit. For this reason he gets loads of Joey Votto comps. I’m sure to be a bit higher than most on Pratto, but he may have the highest upside on this list. He’s still three plus years away, so he’s not the right fit for every league, but you should be aggressive in going after Pratto in first year player drafts of deeper dynasty formats. ETA: 2021

89. Anderson Espinoza, RHP Padres | Level: N/A | 2017 Stats: Did Not Pitch Injured

Who would have thought a year ago that we’d be saying, maybe the Red Sox got the better half of the Drew Pomeranz for Espinoza deal. But here we are. Espinoza is on the shelf for another year after undergoing Tommy John back in late July. The promise is still here, but he’s barely holding on. ETA: 2021

90. Tristen Lutz, OF Brewers | Level: Rk | 2017 Stats: .311/.398/.559, 9 HR, 27 RBI, 4 SB

I guess you might say I sweat the Brewers style, and I prolly do. But they just keep trading for, drafting, and developing talented players. Lutz is the next in a long line. A complete hitter with plus contact skills and power, Lutz looks like a prototypical middle of the order hitting corner outfielder. ETA: 2020

91. Isaac Paredes, SS Tigers | Level: A | 2017 Stats: .252/.338/.387, 11 HR, 70 RBI, 2 SB

It’s easy to look at Paredes statline and be dismissive, but keep in mind this is an 18 year old who spent the year in full season ball, and was traded at the deadline. With context, it’s not such a bad showing. Paredes possesses above average bat speed, excellent bat to ball skills, and above average power. He’s been described by many as natural hitter, whatever that means. Draws comps to Jhonny Peralta and Gleyber Torres, not sure if they too were natural hitters. ETA: 2020

92. Marcus Wilson, OF Diamondbacks | Level: A | 2017 Stats: .295/.383/.446, 9 HR, 54 RBI, 15 SB

Wilson is a good all around player with some ceiling to be a fantasy difference maker. He gets above average grades for his hit tool, approach, power, and speed, meaning he might contribute to all 5 categories in a meaningful way. The numbers speak for themselves, and though it took two years of rookie ball, Wilson was always considered a project. He’s come out the other-side a polished product with tantalizing fantasy tools. ETA: 2020

93. Stephen Gonsalves | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: 9-5, 110 IP, 3.27 ERA, 1.14 WHIP, 118 K, 31 Bb

Is Gonsalves the most underrated pitching prospect in the minors? He misses bats, doesn’t have control issues, and mixes four pitches, two of which are considered plus. He challenges hitters up high, generating lots of popups and lazy flyballs, he uses his plus changeup to both sides of the plate and really does a nice job of working on the black and painting corners. Struggled in AAA, but should see promotion at some point next year. ETA: 2019

94. Brett Phillips, OF Brewers | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: .305/.377/.567, 19 HR, 78 RBI, 9 SB

After a vomit-inducing 2016, Phillips made the most of his friendly AAA confines, riding it to a month plus in the majors. Phillips just slipped under his limits, but showed well in his MLB time. Phillips strikes out too much, but his all fields approach, and ability to work a count and take a walk should save his batting average from repeating a 2016 extinction level event. Nice combo of power and speed, at least early in his career that could see him far exceed this ranking. I’ve always loved the talent, but he has his warts. ETA: 2018

95. Austin Riley, 3B Braves | 2017 Level: AA | 2017 Stats: .275/.339/.446, 20 HR, 74 RBI, 2 SB

Riley has bounced on and off of my top 100 lists, ranking 174th most recently on my Top 200. I’m not sure if Riley is a Razzball reader because there was a fire under his booty in the second half. Upon promotion to AA Mississippi in mid-July the former 1st round supplemental pick hit .315/.389/.511 with 8 homers in just 48 games. Riley has reached the 20 homer mark in each of first two full professional seasons, and the Braves seem focused on keeping him at 3rd. He showed improved plate discipline from 2016, cutting down his strikeout rate from A ball, while walking at a near 10% clip in AA. Riley is still probably a year away, but looks like he could be a decent source of power. ETA: 2019

96. Shed Long, 2B Reds | Level: AA | 2017 Stats: .281/.358/.477, 16 HR, 50 RBI, 9 SB

An offseason darling of yours truly, and season long teammate of 2nd rated 3rd base prospect Nick Senzel. Shed, had a serious Jekyll and Hyde season. He was excellent in A ball slashing .312/.358/.543 with 13 homers in 62 games. A late June callup to AA didn’t go nearly as smooth. Long slashed .227/.312/.362 with just 3 homers over 42 games with Pensacola. It should be noted he was a little unlucky on balls in play, and did improve both his strikeout and walk rates at AA. While it’s certainly a hitch in his excellent track record of production, it’s not all bad. Shed’s got a quick lefty swing with an uppercut path, leading to some swing and miss but also a good power floor. I think there’s potentially 25 homer power in Long’s bat. ETA: 2019

97. Isan Diaz, 2B Brewers | Level: A+ | 2017 Stats: .222/.334/.376, 13 HR, 54 RBI, 9 SB

It was a very down season for Diaz, as his slugging percentage dropped by nearly 100 points. With his batting average already a future struggle, Diaz needs to hit for power in order to keep fantasy relevancy. Unfortunately a .376 slugging percentage ain’t getting it done. Perhaps it’s just growing pains in the young sluggers development. Despite his struggles this year there’s still a lot to like about the profile. Good on base skills, raw power, speed, and the ability to play some short. Diaz isn’t a bad buy low in deeper dynasties. Wouldn’t surprise me if 2018 was a solid bounce back. ETA: 2019

98. Monte Harrison, OF Brewers | Level: A+ | 2017 Stats: .272/.350/.481, 21 HR, 67 RBI, 27 SB

After going in 2nd round out of high school Harrison toiled around in rookie ball for the first two years of his career before breaking out in 2017. Based on the power and speed alone I should love Harrison, but he’s 22, has been in pro ball since 2014, and was still striking out nearly 30% of the time despite his professional experience. That said there’s a nice fantasy profile here, with plenty of upside. I’m not above owning another Keon Broxton, are you? ETA: 2019

99. Chris Shaw, 1B Giants | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: .292/.346/.525, 24 HR, 79 RBI, 0 SB

Another unheralded former early round pick from the 2015 draft, Shaw displayed massive power at Boston College, slugging .611 his junior year. He hit well at AAA Sacramento in 2017 slashing .289/.328/.530 despite striking out 29% of the time. Shaw’s swing and miss and middling approach leave some questions as to how he’ll translate at the next level, but there’s some opportunity in the power starved Giants lineup (lowest slugging in MLB). Whether he plays everyday in the left field or at first remains to be seen. ETA: 2018

100. Danny Jansen, C Blue Jays | Level: AAA | 2017 Stats: .323/.400/.484, 10 HR, 48 RBI, 1 SB

Following three and a half uninspiring seasons in the minors, Jansen noticed something off with his eye sight. When he was diagnosed with astigmatism late last season, he started wearing glasses in games, and immediately noticed a huge difference in how he saw the ball. The results followed in 2017, as he climbed three levels of the minors, and finds himself on the cusp of a big league debut. Jansen isn’t a stud in anyone one particular area, but he’s a good all around hitter with contact, plate approach, and above average power. Could be a .280/14/65 player within the next few seasons, with some room for a little more at peak. ETA: 2018

 

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  1. Packers says:
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    Fun read, Ralph. Where would you rank Tapia if he was still eligible? I have him taking up one of my 6 reserve spots in a keep all 12 team roto dynasty. Keep or move on?

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Packers: I’d place him in the top 30-40. He just needs everyday at bats. Which in Colorado might still be hard to come by.

  2. Lougle says:
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    This is great, thanks for this. What is keeping Hiura out of the top 50? Is it more the uncertainty around the injury or lack of power (or something else)? He had a good year in the minors and seems to fit the profile of a fantasy prospect that might get downgraded on other lists because of defense.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Lougle: The elbow thing brings some questions, but a lot of it is lack of evaluation. I’ve only seen so much of him, really like what I saw, but I’d have to be blown away to rank him any higher than say 30-35.

  3. Alex says:
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    Really down on Yadier Alvarez now? Last year it seemed like he was on his way to elite prospect status. He had a rough year but still getting the Ks.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Alex: I suppose, he’ll be in the next 50, but a guy struggling like he has that’s still two years away has a shot to regain status. These after all, are just a snapshot in time.

  4. chris says:
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    Heliot Ramos makes me hot.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @chris: That’s two of us!

  5. Anon Gonzalez says:
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    Where would Francis Martes fall on this list if still available and what %chance does Martes have of staying in the Ro?

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Anon Gonzalez: He’d probably drop to about 60 or so. I’m a little worried about his control, and future role for 2018. Makes him tough to own in shallower dynasty formats that don’t value holds. I do think by 2019 he’s in the rotation, there or somewhere.

  6. Rich says:
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    Ortiz and Heredia look like two who could make big jumps on this list by mid season. Your write up on Welker caught my attention, do you think he has more upside than these two?

    Alonso has a bit of a Willie Calhoun feel to him. No love on real life lists, but dude just mashes.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Rich: I’ll go a step further, I think Alonso has a Rhys Hoskins feel to him. Right handed hitting first baseman, hits everywhere, always sold short.

      I’d throw Marsh into that group as well, I think Welker has similar upside. The other two might have a higher home run ceiling. All very good around players.

  7. J-FOH says:
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    Edwin Rios will make a nice DH someday

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @J-FOH: Yessir, I agree, flexible enough to fit a few roles early.

      • J-FOH says:
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        @Ralph Lifshitz: He’s our next Willie C!

        • Ralph Lifshitz

          Ralph Lifshitz says:
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          @J-FOH: He might be!

            • Ralph Lifshitz

              Ralph Lifshitz says:
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              @J-FOH: For The edWin!

  8. Grey

    Grey says:
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    “Controlled violence is the best way to describe Andujar’s swing.” — Ha! Nice…

    Surprised to see Chance Adams so low, if you get a sniff of what Yankees fans would tell ya, he’s the next big thing…

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Grey: They’re crazy, Halp’s lower than I am and he’s a Yankees fan. Looks like a number 3 starter, I’d be shocked if he turns into anything more than Drew Pomeranz.

      • Grey

        Grey says:
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        His trends on Ks are going wrong way, but he does throw hard… Looks like a middle reliever to me, but I have watched any tape on him yet

        • Ralph Lifshitz

          Ralph Lifshitz says:
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          @Grey: He’s a converted reliever, like it says in the first sentence…:) Seems like a mid-rotation arm that will have his stretches. The ERA is nice, but that can often be a mirage.

          I like him, but to think he’s top 50 on a fantasy list is bananaland. Then again people say “i don’t like players” because they’re ranked 5-10 spots lower than another list.

          • J-FOH says:
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            @Ralph Lifshitz: I’ll need to check Halp’s list before I judge yours

          • Grey

            Grey says:
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            Yeah, looks like he should be converted back, but still young, Kluber did nothing until age 28…

            • Ralph Lifshitz

              Ralph Lifshitz says:
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              @Grey: You might not be wrong, but I’m sure he gets a shot at some starts next year, and even more so if he’s traded.

              • Grey

                Grey says:
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                Oh, if he’s traded to, say, the Padres, he becomes their ace and pitches 175 IP in the majors next year

                • Ralph Lifshitz

                  Ralph Lifshitz says:
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                  @Grey: I really would be shocked if he ever pitches for the Yankees, and if he does it will be a year at most.

                  • Grey

                    Grey says:
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                    He feels like a prime trade piece as they sign some aging starter this offseason (for better or worse)

                    • Ralph Lifshitz

                      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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                      @Grey: Or trade Frazier, Adams, and a lower minors kid say Dermis Garcia (yes his name is DERMIS!!) for a top 2 starter.

                    • Grey

                      Grey says:
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                      Is Frazier under contract? Oh he’s awful, they should release him

                    • Ralph Lifshitz

                      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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                      @Grey: Clint Frazier

                    • Grey

                      Grey says:
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                      Oh, my B…Watching playoff baseball makes me only think of the one currently playing…

  9. Miketron says:
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    So I take it you no longer like Yusniel Diaz over Starling Heredia? Diaz is closer and continued looking very good in his few AFL games. Just curious what changed for you?

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Miketron: He played well across a few levels. Has a higher end skill. There’s a lot that happens with rookie and short season ball guys between July 1st and end of the year.

  10. Ray Parizo says:
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    No Quantrill in top 100? Missed him or coming up?

    • SheriffMcRawDawg says:
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      @Ray Parizo: he’s 79

  11. J-FOH says:
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    I think it needs to be brought up that we have two first name last names, a guy whose name is really close to Corbin bernson… major league! And a guy who is named after a small structure for storing your lawn mower. These are the things I want/expect to read on Razzball… hey I wrote it so therefore it now exists on razzball

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @J-FOH: Totally forgot about Corbin Bernsen then again I don’t have an AARP card.

      The Shed Long joke, ahhh yes the Shed Long joke. Not to be confused with the Shed Long stroke which is what I do on Farmer Role Play Night in the Lifshitz house.

      • J-FOH says:
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        @Ralph Lifshitz: hey what do you do when you have a nice tool… put a shed over it! OH!!! That’s a joke for us with big bellys

        • Rich says:
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          @J-FOH: any Chance you could Wander out to the Shed and grab me a Phillips out of the toolbox?

          • Ralph Lifshitz

            Ralph Lifshitz says:
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            @Rich: Keller pun Rich, but any Chance you can Cease the bad puns?

            • J-FOH says:
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              @Ralph Lifshitz: my deplantier fascitis has been killing me lately. I’m going to stay off my feet and watch Manning in the Mountcastle on Amazon Prime

              • Ralph Lifshitz

                Ralph Lifshitz says:
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                @J-FOH: not bad, you really brought it home at the end. It’s French so it’s Du-Plant-e-a! #Fancy

                • SheriffMcRawDawg says:
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                  @Ralph Lifshitz: you guys sound like Morejons

                  • Another Dan says:
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                    @SheriffMcRawDawg:

                    I was gonna call them Prattos but that would have been a Rooker mistake.

                  • Grey

                    Grey says:
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                    Haha

                    • SheriffMcRawDawg says:
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                      @J-FOH: shhhh! don’t Paredes in the comments

  12. SheriffMcRawDawg says:
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    man that’s a tough stretch to rank. good shit.

    thoughts:
    – Dupe, 69… niceeee
    – of course you had to throw Guzman on here after I tried to “allegedly” illegally pick him up “apparently”
    – there must be some mistake, I didn’t see Blake Swihart in the first 50 and I damn sure don’t see him here…

    • SheriffMcRawDawg says:
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      @SheriffMcRawDawg: obviously has to be the rookie limits

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @SheriffMcRawDawg: You were on the Dupe train real early.
      I would have outbid you for Guzman, and he’ll now be drafted before either of us pick hahaha

      Totes forgot

  13. Another Dan says:
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    Evening Ralph,

    Love your posts.

    Not so impressed with my own roster with regards to 51-100. Have a mere 3. Although lots are unowned because we are yet to hold our FYPD. 25 of your top 100 are available, I have 3 picks in the first 24 so I’ll get a few more.

    Might need to make room by cutting a few. Have 3 spaces as it is from promoting Chapman and Gsellman (who I will probably cut) and trading for Ahmed Rosario.

    Sam Travis ? With Chavis playing at 1B, are the Sox saying Travis doesn’t feature in their long term plans?

    David Paulino ? PED suspension seems to have derailed him. Do you expect him to bounce back back up the list ?

    Will they figure in the top 200?

    Best wishes,

    Another Dan

    Football update : Hyde (our conquerors in the FA Cup) drew a League One team at home (MK Dons aka franchise FC) in the next round. Oh, what might have been. League action on Sat.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Another Dan: The back end is where you find the up and comers, add away.

      Looks like Travis will have to get traded to get everyday Abs.

      Paulino is tough, he so big that his timing comes and goes for stretches. I think he’s a pen guy.

      Neither are in my Top 200

      MK Dons is one of those teams that loses to a Premier League team every year hahaha.

  14. nightpandas says:
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    Thanks for all the hard work this year Ralph!

    RIP Gord Downie…..Canada lost a legend today…

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @nightpandas: Thanks for reading!

      Sorry to hear that, don’t know much Tragically Hip, but I know they were huge in Canada.

  15. Jose says:
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    Thanks Ralph,
    I love this lists because they usually bring up a player or two that wasn’t on my radar, this time it was Starling Heredia. I would like you to compare him to Jhailin Ortiz, so far I like Ortiz better.
    I am loaded with OF, I have Acuna and Robles both and I am planning on selling high on Robles, before he gets exposed and trading him in a package for a need.
    I would like to get one or both of Ortiz and Heredia. I love players with Plus, Plus power with high OBP and OPS, steals are not a priority in Scoresheet Baseball.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Jose: I think Heredia has a little more speed, chance he has more impact early, but both look like exciting talents.

      You have a good plan there. I haven’t messed with scoresheet. Any good?

      • Jose says:
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        @Ralph Lifshitz: Scoresheet is a lot of fun!!!!
        It is very unpredictable, some times you think you had a great week and you only win two of six games. other weeks your pitching gets killed and you think I am going to go 0-6 and you win games 13-7, 15-5 and 8-5 etc. , it very realistic. Check the site below:
        http://www.scoresheet.com/BB_index.php

        I was looking for a scouting reports on both Heredia and Ortiz and found a fangraphs list of international players before the 2015 draft that had scouting reports and videos for a lot of players. I was very impressed with Heredia an was like 161/2 and then look at Ortiz and he too was really driving the ball, then they threw him a few curves and I started laughing and thinking of Clint Estwood’s movie “Trouble with curve”. Where a hot shot prospect thinks he is the best hitter in the world and skinny Mexican kid star pitching to him and he hits a couple balls out of the park and then they tell him throw him some curves and he couldn’t touch the ball, they signed the pitcher and not the hitter.

        I am going to see how they start next year and may eventually get both.

        • Ralph Lifshitz

          Ralph Lifshitz says:
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          @Jose: Ortiz had trouble with breaking pitches at points, but made adjustments and really starting killing anything hung over the plate. Which is all you need to do, very few hitters in the world can hit a good breaking ball. It’s all about hitting the mistakes. I look at Heredia and see a better Puig. I look at Ortiz and the ceiling is a righthanded David Ortiz.

          • Jose says:
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            @Ralph Lifshitz: @Ralph Lifshitz: I like those comps, like I said I am going try an pick them both up some time this year, since they are 18,19 years old our league has tendency of going for the guys that are in AA or AAA. That is the reason I like to go for the studs a year or two early and hold on for my reward.

            I just read an article on D. J. Peters (https://www.milb.com/milb/news/dj-peters-journey-to-los-angeles-dodgers-passes-through-arizona/c-258869486 ) I already liked the guy, he remind me of a young Jason Werth. He is 6’6- 225 with very long hair, but his beard is a little more groomed than JW. He jumped from 13 HRs in 2016 to 27 HRs in 2017 and I read he worked out in the off season with Justin Turner and Chris Taylor and we know what Taylor did this year and he credits Turner for his change. I think I am going to pick him up too. Now I need to change my leagues to use 10 OF at a time.

            What is your opinion on Peters?

  16. Dougie says:
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    Yo yo
    Ralph, what is the ETA for guys like Trammel, Florial, Jahmai Jones and Adell?

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Dougie: 2020 and 2021 for Adell. I need to add ETAs to the top 50

  17. LenFuego says:
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    Great lists, Ralph.

    One thing I am wondering is what time frame do these rankings encompass?

    A prospect’s ranking depends to an extremely high degree upon the time frame of the league. On one end of the spectrum are redraft leagues (where all that matters is the numbers you expect a player to put up in the coming season) and at the other end are dynasty leagues (where you need to consider the numbers you expect a player to put up for their entire career). And there are many flavors in between those two extremes (e.g., leagues where you are allowed to keep a guy for a set number of years (typically 3-5), where a player’s cost/salary increases each year, or where you are allowed to keep only a limited number of players/prospects).

    A guy like Hunter Greene, for instance, might be essentially undraftable for a 2018 redraft league, but a top 20 (or even top 5) player for dynasty leagues.

    So when you are deciding where to rank the prospects, what time frame do you use?

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @LenFuego: Dynasty predominantly. Prospect rankings for re-draft this early would be worthless because you shouldn’t be drafting re-draft teams until late March. The underlying premise of all my work is that this is best used to apply in dynasty.

      Obviously on the other end there is not catch all. There’s so many types of leagues, and scoring formats.

      • LenFuego says:
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        @Ralph Lifshitz: Thanks, that makes sense and is good to know.

        My primary league is an auction keeper league with some complicated rules that impact prospect values a great deal – e.g., after the 2nd year of owning a guy, you have to either drop them or sign them to a 1-to-3 year contract (the longer the contract, the higher the salary). So from a certain perspective I am looking long-term (up to 5 years) but ideally a prospect blossoms within 2 years so you can squeeze as much value out of them within 5 years and know how many years to sign them for when the contract year rolls around. By and large the successful teams each year tend to be the ones who best balanced long and short-term prospect value two years earlier – half the owners do not really even get that and are rarely at or near the top.

        • Ralph Lifshitz

          Ralph Lifshitz says:
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          @LenFuego: Cool, those are tough. Sometimes I get to cute in those sorts of formats. I passed inn Acuna in one league for Robert Gsellman cause I thought I would get 150+ sub-4 ERA innings from Gsellman. Not. So. Much.

          Do as I say, not as I do.

  18. Huffin Gas says:
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    Jhailyn Ortiz is an interesting cat. I read an article recently and one of the Phils player development guys actually said he’s more excited about this kid than anyone else in their system. If he progresses as presumed, he looks like a top 5 prospect in the long run. Armaro signed him young and took the shot. Gotta give them credit.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Huffin Gas: yeah I have liked Ortiz for a bit, actually got him in the 4th round of a 3 team dynasty draft back in 2016. He passed the first test, and it’s a rare skill set for sure.

  19. Old School Brother says:
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    You forgot Yohander Mendez…….

    …………………..

  20. Lougle says:
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    How close was Carter Kieboom to making this list? Was it just lack of playing time this year or something else? He could be a nice get in the later rounds of a prospect draft if his value gets depressed because of the injuries this year.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Lougle: Close, he was in the next 20 or so, but ultimately I went another direction. He’s a very good offensive SS prospect though

  21. Dr. Kenneth Noisewater says:
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    Good job

  22. Dr. Kenneth Noisewater says:
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    No, great job!

  23. Dr. Kenneth Noisewater says:
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    Prospects!

  24. Sean says:
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    Penultimate means “second last”… if you want an impressive-sounding word for what you meant, consider “archetypal”. :)

Comments are closed.