Please see our player page for Donovan Solano to see projections for today, the next 7 days and rest of season as well as stats and gamelogs designed with the fantasy baseball player in mind.

(NOTE: THIS POST WAS RELEASED EARLY THIS WEEK ON OUR PATREON. IT’S $10/MONTH.)

Leody Taveras reminds me of how Marshall Applewhite, the co-leader of the Heaven’s Gate cult, made everyone change their name so it ended with -ody. Too bad he had his entire cult leave behind their earth skins, like they were dry potato skins at TGIF’s that was lacking some sour cream, because Marshall Applewhite would be walking around right now gleefully, “Whody on First? Whatody on 2nd? I don’t knowody on third? Becausody is supposed to be in center, but Leody has replaced him.” That’s Marshall Applewhite, known Hale-Bopp comet and fantasy baseball lover. He called himself Bo and his co-leader called herself Peep (or vice versa, I don’t know), but it’s funny to think about the one guy in the cult who was prolly like, “Hey, uh, guys, Little Bo Peep is one character, and you’ve separated the names into two. It would be like two people renaming themselves Michael and Vincent after Jan-Michael Vincent.” Any hoo! Leody Taveras was a sleeper of mine last year; loved him because of his ability to hit for power and steal some bags, while having great contact, but that fish got flushed when he didn’t pan out. Hows’ever, Leody’s still only 23 years old, has 70-grade speed, surprising power, and he’s currently hitting. That’s right, he’s returned from the dead! (Like those Heaven’s Gate people anticipated.) Anyway, here’s some more players to Buy or Sell this week in fantasy baseball:

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Lionel Richie, “Say you…

Suzuki, “Seiya…”

All together, “Say it for always…That’s the way it should be!”

And he’s signed by the Cubs! Um, Seiya Suzuki not Lionel Richie, Though, how’s Lionel’s arm? The Cubs could use a starter. “Hello, is it me you’re looking for?” That’s Lionel Richie picking up the bullpen phone. All right, enough giggles, this move’s got me all fired up! Seiya Suzuki just landed in a top five situation. The lineup around him is whatever, but that’s better for him. No way the Cubs pull any nonsense like platooning him or resting him more than he needs. As the new Cubs starter Lionel Richie would say, “We’re going to Party, Karamu, Fiesta, forever!” Also, Wrigley gives Seiya the little extra bang for his power buck that you want to see. Saw him as a 23-29 homer guy. A much bigger range than you want, but he landed in a solid spot that will give him the top-end of his homer range. “I’ve got this feeling down deep in my soul that Seiya just can’t lose!” That’s right, Lionel! Finally, Seiya’s speed was likely five to 12 range. Again, big range, bigger than you want, but he prolly lands on the high-end of that because the Cubs won’t slow him. “Woo-oh, what a feeling (Woo-oh, what a feeling).” I got it too, Lionel! I’ve done a big update on the outfielders rankings and moved Seiya up to the top 40 outfielders for 2022 fantasy baseball, and he’s now on the tail-end of the top 100 for 2022 fantasy baseball. Also, my top 500 for 2022 fantasy baseball has been updated. For a huge breakdown of Seiya, check out Coolwhip’s Seiya Suzuki fantasy. It’s worth the read. Anyway, here’s what else I saw this preseason for 2022 fantasy baseball:

Please, blog, may I have some more?

We’re now a week past the trade deadline and now that the dust has settled, new opportunities are there for guys you weren’t counting on to rack up fantasy points. The playing time situation has shifted for several teams so we’ll be seeing some fresh faces climbing the points lists. One such newcomer is Carter Kieboom (28) This could be the start of something. After struggling against major league pitching to the point that he’s spent most of the season in the minors he’s back and rewarded anyone who was brave enough to start him with a 28 point week. He’s out there in virtually every league so run to the waiver wire right now to add him in case he can keep this up. He was a highly-touted prospect so it’s not he lacks talent. I’d say the potential return is worth the last player on your bench. Let’s see who else had a good week.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

We have six no-hitters by May 19th. Seven no-hitters is a modern-day season record. At this point, it will be more novel when someone throws a ten-hitter. Soon we’ll be celebrating:  Kyle Gibson just threw a 7-hitter! He allowed hits! Never is now, Mr. Gibson! This is like 2001 and Barry Bonds is throwing a no hitter every game. Conspiracy Theory Alert! Rob Manfred is going to use this year to explain why the mound has to move back a foot next year, and then we’re going to have our first 100-homer season. I will bet someone this happens. We’re thinking small, Rob Manfred’s evil mind is thinking big picture. Or pitcher, in this case, because only jacked guys will be able to reach the plate. So, Corey Kluber (9 IP, 0 ER, 0 hits, 1 walk, 9 Ks, ERA at 2.86) threw a no-hitter against his old club, the Rangers. Not the other team that the Rangers killed. The question for us is Corey Kluber fixed. Or at least usable, which I honestly had questions about coming into the year. His numbers look number two to three-ish. He’s not an ace — 9 K/9, 3.6 BB/9, 4.17 xFIP, using xFIP there because I do believe he’s been a tad ‘lucky’ on homers. It’s solid, usable, and rosterable, which is what I say before he throws a consecutive no-hitter next time because:  2021. By the way, Johnny Vander Meer’s family moving his crypt from stadium to stadium this year must be exhausting, and there’s no way Johnny Vander Meer’s record makes it out of 2021. Anyway, here’s what else I saw yesterday in fantasy baseball:

Please, blog, may I have some more?

With April in the rear view mirror and June fast approaching, we are starting to see a lot less wild movement in the Top 25 Fantasy Shortstop rankings.

Two weeks ago, five new players entered the rankings – Alex Bregman, Brandon Crawford, Paul DeJong, Freddy Galvis and Kike Hernandez. While all five players produced well to move into the rankings, they were help by the continued freefall of Francisco Lindor and the cold bats of Eugenio Suarez and Donovan Solano and injuries to Jean Segura and Ketel Marte.

Now in Week 7, the top shortstops have, for the most part, moved to the top of the rankings while the middle tier players are settling into their spot in the rankings. Of course, not all the stars are performing as expected and players you probably thought were never going to valuable in fantasy baseball are doing their best to get off the free agent wire.

If you are wondering about Lindor and where he is ranked, don’t waste your time. He is still missing in action this season, hitting .195 with two home runs and seven RBI. I guess if there is a bright spot, both of his home runs and five of his seven RBI have come over the last two weeks. If you can buy low on him, you might as well do it because he has to turn it around at some point, right?

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Howdy-do, Razzgals and guys.

It’s Saturday morning, you’re glad it’s the weekend, and you’re ready to read your favorite uplifting article to carry those lifted spirits throughout the next couple of days. Or rather, you’ll be lifting spirits of a different kind repeatedly toward your face hole as you drown out the bad news you’re about to read.

Except actually it’s not all bad news this week! There’s one terrible piece of news hinted at in the headline that I’ll get to shortly, but other than that, this is a week of rehab stint updates, progress reports of various kinds, and healthy returns! I’ll cheers my lifted spirit to that! Still plenty of injuries to cover, though, don’t worry.

Friendly reminder: Other writers cover some injuries throughout the week, so if you’re looking for an update on a player not mentioned here, slap their name into the ol’ search bar and give it a look-see. I’m just here to give you the latest injury buzz for the week, but that doesn’t necessarily mean I’ll be mentioning everyone you care about each and every time.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

The month of April has come and gone. Among the hundreds of players in Major League Baseball, perhaps no one is happier about that than Francisco Lindor.

Acquired in the offseason by the New York Mets to be the face and anchor of the franchise, the perennial All-Star is off to such a bad start, Mets fans are greeting him with boos. That is what happens when you are hitting .189 with a .299 on-base percentage and a woeful .243 slugging percentage.

Is this just a player trying too hard to impress his new team and fanbase? Maybe. Lots of players have struggled to adjust to new settings or the bright lights of New York before figuring things out. Perhaps, however, Lindor’s struggles are not a blip. When you look deeper into his stats, maybe what we are seeing now is the start of a trend.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

The start of the baseball season is fascinating because you can quickly see which owners are quick to ditch players and which owners believe in the slow and steady approach.

For dynasty leagues, owners are conditioned to ride out the slow starts and sometimes overlook the hot streaks, knowing that by the end of the season the good players will likely be good and the fringe players will likely be back on the fringes.

But for non-dynasty owners, being quick to react can be the difference between winning and losing. A lot of owners were surely thinking there is no way Yermin Mercedes would still be red-hot at the plate. But he is, and he is making those owners who snatched him up look like geniuses.

These rankings are more of a reflection of the owner’s who lead the league in adds and drops.  Thanks to a hot two or three weeks, players who were barely on the radar of fantasy players are now Top 10 second baseman. Meanwhile, expected studs such as Ozzie Albies, DJ LeMahieu and Brandon Lowe would be on the free-agent scrap heap if not for their name and track history.

So let’s see who has been red-hot and moved up the rankings and let’s find out how far Albies, LeMahieu and Lowe have fallen.
For dynasty leagues, owners are conditioned to ride out the slow starts and sometimes overlook the hot streaks, knowing that by the end of the season the good players will likely be good and the fringe players will likely be back on the fringes.

But for non-dynasty owners, being quick to react can be the difference between winning and losing. A lot of owners were surely thinking there is no way Yermin Mercedes would still be red-hot at the plate. But he is, and he is making those owners who snatched him up look like geniuses.

These rankings are more of a reflection of the owner’s who lead the league in adds and drops.  Thanks to a hot two or three weeks, players who were barely on the radar of fantasy players are now Top 10 second baseman. Meanwhile, expected studs such as Ozzie Albies, DJ LeMahieu and Brandon Lowe would be on the free agent scrap heap if not for their name and track history.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Howdy, folks.

Well, here we go again. More injuries to mull over. Let’s rip this Band-Aid off.

Note: The writers cover injuries throughout the week, so if you’re looking for an update on a player not mentioned here, slap their name into the ol’ search bar and give it a look-see. I’m just here to give you the latest injury buzz for the week, but that doesn’t necessarily mean I’ll be mentioning everyone you care about each time.

Please, blog, may I have some more?