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The Giants are one of the more unheralded organization’s in sports when you step back and consider the immense success they’ve achieved over the past 10 years. Yet they seem to rarely get credit when talking about the top teams of the last decade. And from a player development standpoint they’re just as underrated. While they’re certainly no juggernaut on par with the Astros, Red Sox, and Dodgers of the world; they’ve done a good job of developing a solid core of players, including two of the best at their respective positions in Madison Bumgarner and Buster Posey. However, in recent years the Giants have been short on high impact prospects, instead churning out role players, and back end of the rotation pitchers. While not much has changed in that regard, there’s hope that Bryan Reynolds, Heath Quinn, and 2015 2nd rounder Andrew Suarez could give them a few above average major league players in the making. Real baseball Ralph…… Why do I care? Honestly, depending upon league size you don’t have to. But for those of you who are deep league junkies like myself, there’s a core of interesting fringe prospects that could offer sneaky value in the short term. So you’ll notice there’s no Tier 1: Specs On the Beach in this system, but they’re overflowing with Tier 2: Floorbored types, led by 2014 first rounder Tyler Beede. This falls in line with their overall draft strategy over the past few seasons, preferring high floor picks to those with higher ceilings. I think this year’s crop strayed from that mantra a little in the later rounds but I’m sure San Fran will boring them up. Okay, now that I’ve attached one hundred qualifiers to this intro, let’s talk some prospects! It’s the Top San Francisco Giants Prospects for 2017 Fantasy Baseball.

 

Tier 2: Floorboreds
Lacking the “star” upside. They might have some warts, but their ETAs are on the horizon.

Tyler Beede, RHP | Age: 23 | ETA: 2017 | 2016 Level: AA

The pride of Auburn, Ma, which just so happens to be the town next over from from your buddy Ralph. So let’s just say I know people, that know people, that know Young Beedah. After a successful career at storied Vanderbilt, Beede has not developed the way many hoped. While he certainly looks like a future major leaguer, it’s more than likely as a mid-rotation starter, and not the power pitching stud some had envisioned. He’s done a good job of learning the art of pitching, improving below average control and command into an average tool. His four seamer regained the velocity it lost in 2015, and can touch 97 when needed. His curveball is a weapon when he controls it, and grades out as his best pitch on it’s good days. Beede mixes an average to above average change, and a few different variations of his two seam fastball, including a cutter and a sinker. His ability to mix a varied repertoire, and keep hitters off balance will be his greatest asset at the next level. San Fran’s superior pitching environment, and Beedah’s quality stuff makes him a solid piece for the back end of your dynasty team’s rotation.

Christian Arroyo, SS | Age: 22 | ETA: 2018 | 2016 Level: AA

Arroyo is a hit tool first infielder with little upside elsewhere. He’ll probably be a .280-.300 hitter for a lot of years, with little pop, particularly if he moves off short for third. While it’s tough to say that any player with Arroyo’s bat to ball skill couldn’t develop mid-teen pop. To get to that number range he’d have to alter his heavy groundball approach (50.3% GB). Not really worth owning outside of 18+ team leagues, as he’s a singles and doubles hitter with little speed. I’ve seen comps range from Martin Prado to Matt Duffy.

Chris Shaw, 1B | Age: 23 | ETA: 2018 | 2016 Level: AA/A

A lefty power hitter with pull heavy approach, Shaw is a first base only prospect with defensive questions. Depending upon who you listen to, Shaw could be anything from a power hitting middle of the order bat, to a player who’s exploited at the upper levels, and ends up a platoon power option at the major league level. Unfortunately, I lean the later, as the bats not quick enough, and he lacks great control of the barrel. Shaw knows how to take a walk, but there’s still some swing and miss to his game. Might end up just another three outcome first baseman at the MLB level.

Ty Blach, LHP | Age: 26 | ETA: 2017 | 2016 Level: MLB/AAA

A back end of the rotation innings eater with the ability to throw all his pitches for strikes, Blach has deep league relevancy this year. His sequencing and advanced approach to pitching took a jump forward in 2016, when he added a few ticks on his fastball, and tightened the spin on his hook. His season culminated in him out-dueling Clayton Kershaw on the last day of the season to propel the Giants into the playoffs. Should have an opportunity to win a rotation spot out of camp.

Andrew Suarez, LHP | Age: 24 | ETA: 2018 | 2016 Level: AA/A+

Another Giants starter who’s feel for pitching makes him a safe, but unexciting option for deep leagues. He changes speeds well, moves the ball in and out of the zone, and has the stuff to ramp up and take something off when needed. He’s a lot like fellow Giants lefty Ty Blach, but with better stuff. Suarez has the ability to ramp his four seam fastball with late life up to 95, but mostly works in the low-90’s. He should start the season at AAA Sacramento, and see some starts with the big club before the end of 2017.

Joan Gregorio, RHP | Age: 25 | ETA: 2017 | 2016 Level: AAA/AA

When you’re a man named Joan it helps to be 6’7 and look like this. Gregorio has a two pitch mix with some funk due to his off-kilter delivery. He spent all of 2016 in the rotation, but due to his lack of a third pitch, and some injury history he looks like a high leverage reliever to me. His Fastball and slider play up due to his unusual arm slot and downhill plane, which means he should continue to miss bats at a high rate once he hits AT&T.

Steven Duggar, OF | Age: 23 | ETA: 2018 | 2016 Level: AA/A+

After going in the 6th round of the 2015 draft, Duggar has shown off across the board ability in his first year and half in proball. A left handed hitter with an above average hit tool, Duggar profiles as a top of the order bat due to his on base ability and plus speed. His home run power is only fringe, and his speed doesn’t play up on the base paths, but he looks like he could contribute in multiple categories once he reaches his peak years. In many ways he reminds me of a poor man’s Adam Eaton. So I will call him Barely Eaton. How’d I do on my Grey impression?

Others: Dylan Davis, Steven Okert, Chris Stratton, Ray Black, Matt Krook, Jordan Johnson

Tier 3: Long Shot Lolitas
Sexy ceilings, but these youngsters also come with risks and distant ETAs

Bryan Reynolds, OF | Age: 22 | ETA: 2018 | 2016 Level: A/Rk

Another Vandy star, and one that fell to the Giants in the second round. Many, myself included, expected Reynolds to go in the first round due to his hitting acumen and pedigree. A switch-hitter with a natural feel for hitting, and average power, Reynolds has been going in around pick 30 in a majority of my first year player drafts. In his junior year with the Commodores Reynolds began to walk more, however his approach has been a little lackadaisical at times in proball. This has led to low walk rates and high strikeouts. I think best case scenario is, Reynolds improves his plate approach, develops 20 homer power, and becomes an above average corner outfielder. Based on where he’s going not a bad value in first year player drafts.

Sandro Fabian, OF | Age: 18 | ETA: 2020 | 2016 Level: Rk

After a solid pro debut in the Dominican Summer League, Fabian broke out in the rookie level AZL slashing .329/.355/.510, and ranking among the leaders in several offensive categories. He posses a balanced swing with natural bat to ball ability. Many scouts doubt the power potential, but his inherent hitting acumen makes him capable of tapping into more pop as he matures physically. He needs to improve his pitch recognition skills, and approach, but at age 19 for all of 2017, he has time to work on that. If you’re looking for a lottery ticket bat, Fabian offers a higher than usual floor due to his hit tool.

Heath Quinn, OF | Age: 21 | ETA: 2019 | 2016 Level: A+/A-/Rk

One of the favorites of the pipeline podcast, I went extra bold in my First Year Player Draft Rankings and put Quinn at 10th overall. His plus game power, above average pitch recognition skills, and plate approach make him an attractive gamble in dynasty. With Quinn’s power to all fields, and ability to take a walk, he should take the hitter/homer-friendly Cal League by storm in 2017.

Others: C.J. Hinojosa, Jalen Miller, Kevin Beltre, Johneshwy Fargas, Jacob Heyward

 

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  1. Lord Tehol Beddict the God of Gods says:
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    HOW DOES MY MYPHUCKIN DIK TASTE

      • Lord Tehol Beddict the God of Gods says:
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        @Ralph Lifshitz: You stole this writing from my archives. the people need to know the truth

          • Grey

            Grey says:
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            Read that fast, thought you wrote he was foremost expert on pants prospects

            • Ralph Lifshitz

              Ralph Lifshitz says:
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              @Grey: That too! He’s always asking about the prospective growth in my pants.

              • Grey

                Grey says:
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                Pants fit like a glove for that five-tool pants prospect

                • Ralph Lifshitz

                  Ralph Lifshitz says:
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                  @Grey: Tehol saw five tools and his pants got tight.

                  • Grey

                    Grey says:
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                    He went to a store to try on cords, and he wrapped himself in extensions

  2. Sweatpants Nation says:
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    He’s baaaaaack….

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Sweatpants Nation: Man, my brother from another mother never left.

  3. Mr Baseball says:
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    WHO WOULD YOU WANT ON YOUR DYNASTY TEAM

    H. Renfroe or Lewis Brinson

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Mr Baseball: Brinson.

  4. Max

    Julius says:
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    I have the option of getting Luke weaver and Jess Winker in 1 offer, or JP crawford in the other for my aging Longoria in a rebuild. What do you suggest? OBP favored league. Winker and JP both have good OBP ability but is JP that much better than winker that i should pass on it for Weaver?

    Position scarcity doesnt matter in this as I am in full rebuild and just looking for best available value.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Julius: Offers I kind of even. Crawford has more upside than Winker, but you get a solid arm in Weaver.

  5. Matty says:
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    Last year you guys helped me snag Trevor Story in my deep dynasty (somehow he wasn’t one of the fifty rostered minor leaguers).

    Can lightning strike twice? Who is the secret best prospect that no one would have yet?

    Thanks again.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Matty: This may have to wait till my top 100 February 22nd!

      • Matty says:
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        @Ralph Lifshitz:
        A hint maybe?
        Rhymes with Brevor Morey?

        • Ralph Lifshitz

          Ralph Lifshitz says:
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          @Matty: Yes haha

  6. 4th OF Hoarder says:
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    Looking to grab Steven Duggar in a dynasty league. I already have a lot OF prospects, and will need to drop one. How would you compare the following:

    Duggar
    Teoscar Hernandez
    Tony Kemp
    Harold Ramirez

    Thanks!

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @4th OF Hoarder: I think Teoscar and Duggar are similar with Duggar possessing more upside at this point. Especially if he taps into the speed. Kemp looks like a AAAA guy or a bench player. Ramirez is wait and see.

  7. ichirosan says:
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    Hi Ralph,

    same 16-man dynasty I mentioned before. This owner has been sending me Moncada offers constantly. The first I kind of like has Giolito + Newcomb + Barreto for Moncada. Should I take it?

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @ichirosan: No don’t trade Moncada.

  8. Mr Baseball says:
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    I think you can always find pitchers – it might take years before you get any production out of Giolito + Newcomb + Barreto – and they take up 3 orf your roster spots – you might never find another hitter like Moncada – You will ger Limited innings for 3 years from each pitcher and that is if any of them make it – then you have to worry about arm injuries – for me I would at least try to get a hitter back in return that helps your club and 2 of these pitchers if you have to make a deal – won’t be a total lost

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Mr Baseball: They don’t call him Mr. Baseball for nothing folks. Agree

  9. ReleasetheMcKracken says:
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    12 team dynasty, keep forever – JP Crawford/Ian Happ or Austin Meadows/Eloy Jimenez?

  10. Mantis Tobaggan MD says:
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    what is the meaning (by now i’ve seen a lot of it) of it when a prospect evaluation mentions as a negativism “he’s from a cold weather place”. this never made sense when a hockey prospect was labeled this (a.matthews is from ARI) way, what’s the sense of it in baseball? only thing i could think of is maybe their seasons are shorter, thus smaller sample size in the young.

    • Ralph Lifshitz

      Ralph Lifshitz says:
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      @Mantis Tobaggan MD: It implies that they could be raw and being able to play baseball year round could see a significant boost in ability. Sort of like when a football guy scornes D1 programs to play baseball full time.

      Trout is the ultimate example of a cold weather guy.

      • Mantis Toboggan MD says:
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        @Ralph Lifshitz: that “could see a significant boost in ability” is the part i don’t see when i read these prospect evaluations, it’s mentioned in a negative tone. it’d still be weird to say an area “type” is positive like a guy from maine will have a “could see a significant boost in ability” rather than a guy from south carolina for instance. i completely understand when it’s said to ignore pitching results in high altitude locations from everything they throw turns into line drives and/or their breaking balls don’t break (which is true).

        i didn’t know trout was a from a cold weather area (didn’t follow baseball much when he was coming up in prospect status). didn’t seem to affect him badly of course, but i wouldn’t say he’s awesome from that either.

        • Ralph Lifshitz

          Ralph Lifshitz says:
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          @Mantis Toboggan MD: I’ve never seen it used as a negative. Maybe you’re misunderstanding the intent. When you can play 12 months a year outside as opposed to in domes and hitting facilities inside an old factory it’s makes a difference. The So-Cal kids have the benefit of 12 months of good weather. Try hitting a baseball with a wood bat outside in 20 degree weather. So the point of the “Cold weather” comment by scouts is that there’s projection left. Scouts look for projection, in other words, “how can this guy improve, and how much?”

          • Mantis Toboggan MD says:
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            @Ralph Lifshitz: so it is a positive then. damn, old factories, yuck.

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