I’m dropping this one for the head wrap set. The neo-soul, On and On, Better Call Tyrone, Ohhhhh I’m Sorry Ms. Jackson set. Let it be shouted from the mountains the Twins Akil Baddoo is a potential dynasty league breakout for 2018. Sure his mom might be a little overbearing with her giant afro and message of empowerment, but damn can Akil hit. I’ve just been informed that I am incorrect, Akil is not the son of Erykah Badu and Andre 3000. He’s simply another Georgia Peach looking to be the apple of my eye. #Fruitjokes. Taken with the 74th overall pick in the 2016 draft, Baddoo struggled in his first taste of pro-ball, slashing an underwhelming .178/.299/.271, with 2 homers and 8 steals in 38 games in the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League. Sure, that slashline is the kind of cold water that can extinguish the most fiery of prospect crushes. Not for this Prospector, I stand with Baddoo, like he’s symbolic of freedom and kick-assery. Plus he was only 17 years old, and always considered a raw project coming out of the Georgia prep ranks. One that was going to take some time to fully bake. Now that we’ve compared this talented athlete to a sheet of Tollhouse cookies, let’s dive into Baddoo’s excellent 2018, and why he should be a sleeper for 2018 Dynasty Leagues.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

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Tim keeps on slippin’ slippin’ into the future.  And Tim Anderson keeps on bein’ bein’ a sleeper.  This is the pompatus of love.  Member The Pompatus of Love was a movie with Jon Cryer?  Now Jon Cryer is a host for a true crime podcast.  2017, you’re weird.  What does 2018 hold?  Well, you know how children of crazy parents are super normal to make up for their parents, and children of normal parents are super crazy in a vice versa sorta way?  My guess is 2018 will be completely normal.  A backlash against 2017.  This is how these things work.  Also, 2018 can’t get weirder, so there’s that.  I had a dream the other night, it was an erotic dream with Giancarlo, but he wasn’t MVP, so that’s how I knew it was a dream.  In this dream, I was a giant tongue.  Tim Anderson didn’t participate in my dream, but I can see a scenario where Anderson does enter my dreams in 2018.  Last year, he went 17/15/.257 in 587 ABs, i.e. a full season.  On its surface, this is solid, if unspectacular season.  Solid but unspectacular for a guy that will be barely drafted in 12 team mixed leagues, raises my antennas… Antennae?  Antennyay?  Anelevena?  Just making up words now?  So, what can we expect from Tim Anderson for 2018 fantasy baseball and what makes him a sleeper?

Please, blog, may I have some more?
   

Well look at us, we have the Braves, and now the White Sox systems done and it’s only December 3rd. I guess it’s all down hill from here, no? We’ve covered the top two systems, and the World Series ended just about a month ago. Damn, I’m going to have to hustle to make the rest of this series entertaining. Perhaps I should write in all caps all the time. Then again that might be difficult to read after awhile. Instead I’ll go about my business of bringing you my thoughts on as many minor league players as I can stomach. As for the White Sox they are the only team with three players in my top 20 prospects (Eloy Jimenez, Michael Kopech, and Luis Robert). However, the really interesting slant to that narrative is, none of them were in the system this time last year. No team, not the Braves nor the Padres, has done so much to restock their system. Not only do they have some close to the majors talent on both sides of the ball, they also have good depth, with no shortage of power-hitting. I went 17 deep today, but probably could have gone 25-30 if I wasn’t so lazy. The White Sox graduated Yoan Moncada and Lucas Giolito last year, with some players like Carson Fulmer just slipping under their limits. It’s an understatement to say the youth movement is on in the South Side. A looming Jose Abreu trade may fetch even more talent to a system already bursting at the seams. But for that news we wait and see. It’s the 2018 Chicago White Sox Top Prospects.

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The reckoning of Broshitz is upon us! After a couple of solo podcasts I’m back with a new partner, and it’s none other than Razzball writer Lance Brozdowski. It’s a great week to start too, as we jump right into our top 20 in First Year Player Drafts. We kick it off with some in depth Shohei Otani talk, then jump into some of the top talents in this year’s class. We talk MacKenzie Gore, Hunter Greene, Keston Hiura, Heliot Ramos, Jo Adell, and many more. The Razzball Prospect Pod is back, and firing on all cylinders. Finally, please make sure to support our sponsor by heading over to RotoWear.com and entering promo code “SAGNOF” for 15% off the highest quality t-shirts in the fantasy sports game. It’s the latest edition of the Razzball Fantasy Baseball Prospect Podcast:

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In nineteen-aught-eight, William Howard Taft defeated William Jennings Bryant for the presidency; the 4th Olympics took place in London under the glower of crooked teeth; Cy Young pitched his 2nd no-hitter with nary an undershirt; Henry Ford called a Jewish toddler a “baby of suspicious origin;” Orville Wright laid out his plans for flight which included “a crappy bag of peanuts to all passengers and getting hit in the head by elbows as other passengers walk down the aisle,” and Leon Trotsky ate a bean and cheese burrito, getting explosive, uncontrollable diarrhea which resulted in excessive swearing and fist clenching, hence the term “the trots.”  1908 was also famous as being the last year Michael Taylor wasn’t a fantasy baseball sleeper.  We’ve come a long way since then.  The remarkable thing about this bit of trivia is it would lead one to believe Michael Taylor was a sleeper as early as 1909, yet he’s still only 26 years old.  There’s something to be said for aging well, and being bad at math.  Yes, we’ve come to the end of our fantasy baseball rookie posts and we’re onto our fantasy baseball sleepers.  You’re very welcome.  So, what can we expect from Michael Taylor for 2018 fantasy baseball and what makes him a sleeper?

Please, blog, may I have some more?
   

I’m excited to announce that I’ve already participated in my first 2018 fantasy baseball mock draft. And here’s the crazy part, it’s still 2017. Mind blown! Last week Scott White from CBS invited me to join his first mock of the season. While one might have thought I would have passed on the offer considering the 2017 World Series had completed only three weeks earlier, I jumped at the opportunity. And when I say “jumped” I mean I shrugged and said to myself, “What the heck.”

The format for the mock league was head-to-head points using standard CBS scoring. Those of you that have read my posts during the last three years will know that I am a points league kinda guy. My content is focused on this format. What better way to get an early start on some new material than to join eleven other top notch analysts in a way too early mock draft.

Please, blog, may I have some more?
   

This one feels a year away from fantasy production, but since the Dodgers promoted Alex Verdugo this past September, and let him get at-bats, I’m on a fence with hedges all around me.  Or maybe it’s a hedge maze like in The Shining.  Or the Shinning with Groundskeeper Willie.  Or maybe it’s a fence made of hedges.  Or a fence made of hedgehogs.  Ugh, I’m so indecisive I can’t even decide if I’m on a fence of hedges, a fence with hedges around me, a maze of hedges, or a fence of hedgehogs for Alex Verdugo.  Maybe a nap will help…*dozes off, wakes, sees a young Lea Thompson*  It’s 1955!?   Okay, let’s play out the Dodgers’ outfield.  Chris Taylor is in center, but can play the infield; Puig looks locked into right; there’s not enough screws loose in Home Depot for them to not play Cody Bellinger; Joc Pederson is still looming, but he’s starting to feel like a guy that might need a change of scenery or will be a platoon player and Kiké — not Gabe Kapler — can play outfield, but he’s a futility player.  Not a lot of wiggle room for Verdugo, and Los Angeles isn’t known for autumn, but that changing landscape leaves Alex Verdugo with a chance to play if Taylor plays infield.  So, what can we expect from Alex Verdugo for 2018 fantasy baseball?

Please, blog, may I have some more?
   

I hate using the term sleeper, it means so many different things to different people. I recognize that there’s a wide spectrum of knowledge amongst my readership. So to some of you the Yankees Jorge Guzman is a sleeper, but to other’s he’s not. That said, with the ease I added Guzman in my 16-20 team leagues this Fall, I’m willing to go out on a limb from first hand experience, and slap and big ole ZZZZZZZ… label on Guzman. Over the last few months if you follow the minors leagues, The Yankees, or more specifically the Yankees minor leaguers in the Arizona Fall League, then you’ve probably heard all about Justus Sheffield and Albert Abreu, but more specifically Sheffield. A lot. Justus got the BX Bump (which is also a great interracial porn film BTW). If you’re a Yankees fan staying hip to all the up and coming prospects, then you’re probably aware of Chance Adams, Domingo Acevedo, and Dillon Tate. I’m sure you read about Guzman too, but I’m willing to guess the next statement might shatter all of you pre-conceived notions about the Yankees current minor league pitching oligarchy. Jorge Guzman is the best pitching prospect the Yankees have. That’s it, post over. I led you to the cliff only to push you off and leave. I have Christmas, Hanukkah, and Kwanzaa shopping to do… I’M JUST PLAYING BABY! Of course I wouldn’t have left you without some gems to help you. Here’s why Jorge Guzman might be a player to target in off-season dynasty leagues in 2018.

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“This might sound hyperbolic, which isn’t the type of chamber Michael Jackson used to sleep in, but I think Lewis Brinson can be the Rookie of the Year in the NL next year if he gets the ABs.  He could vault himself into the conversation for top ten outfielders as soon as 2018 with the opportunity.  Only thing stopping him besides playing time is his plate discipline.  That concerns me.  He’s pretty swing happy.  Last year in 23 Triple-A games, he walked at a 2.2% clip and K’d at a 22.6% mark.”  And that’s me quoting me from my Lewis Brinson post from last year.  In only 47 ABs last year for the Brewers, Brinson struck out 31% of the time and hit .106.  Super small sample size — that’s what she said, and then I asked her if she meant it ironically.  It does show there’s still a problem here though.  Of course, there’s also still wonderful to be found in Brinson.  His Triple-A numbers last year were 13 HRs, 11 SBs, .331 in 299 ABs while only K’ing 18% of the time.  Right direction for the fire emoji, and away from the flame out, but he did have a .377 BABIP, which is likely a little high, even for someone with his speed.  So, what can we expect from Lewis Brinson for 2018 fantasy baseball?

Please, blog, may I have some more?
   

The once mighty Cubs system is no more. What was once the premier talent pool of young prospects, is now little more than a glorified waiting room for long shot arms, and future fringe MLB regulars. Not to be confused with Future’s M.O.B Regulators, which is a mix tape made entirely in Future’s bathroom following an aggressive lunch at a local Chi-Fil-A. In fact if you listen hard enough, you’ll catch a half dozen flushes between mumbled vocals. That’s all besides the point though, you’re here to get up to speed on the Cubs farm system, and the never-ending list of projectable starting pitchers that litter their list at the moment. So this begs the question… Am I low on the Cubs system? Ahhhh, does a frog bump it’s ass when it hops? Of course I’m low on the Cubs system it’s a bunch of projectable arms! Have you even read me before brah? I hate projectable arms for fantasy! Cause they’re always projecting, and breaking, and breaking, and projecting!! Then again after spending the better part of the week digging into it, there are some bright spots, as well as a handful of breakout candidates. It’s the Top Cubs Prospects for 2018 Fantasy Baseball.

Please, blog, may I have some more?
   
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