Joey Votto (614), Mookie Betts (594), Bryce Harper (567), Victor Martinez (568), Miguel Cabrera (606) and Miguel Cabrera (609). This is a list of the batters with the most fantasy points in the last six seasons. Did you notice that there’s one name noticeably missing from the list? Please, blog, may I have some more?

Please, blog, may I have some more?

After spending about seven weeks on the disabled list possibly sipping rum through a paper straw, Wil Myers appears to be making up for lost time. Please note that Wil uses paper, not plastic, straws because he cares about the environment. You should too. Public service announcement… Check! In the last week Wil posted 45 fantasy points. If the season began at week 14 he would be the top hitter along with Alex Bregman. Do you breg to differ? I didn’t think so. Considering Myers only played ten games before returning at the end of week 13, you could say that his season really did start in week 14. It’s unlikely that he will keep up this pace of 0.76 points per plate appearance, but it’s worth keeping an eye on Mr. Myers moving forward. If you’ve had him stashed all this time, it might just be about to pay some hefty dividends. However, with all of that said, given his injury history, I’d seriously consider selling high. Tim Lincecum just traded him in every league he owns him. Even a few he doesn’t.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Finally (read in your best Dwayne Johnson voice) I am writing about Blake Snell. With 356 points Snell is a top ten starting pitcher in points leagues. He is averaging just under 20 points per start and is striking out just over ten batters per nine innings. Considering an average draft position of 162 (14th round), owners have more than quadrupled their draft day investment. It’s all sunshine and roses, right? I’m not so sure. That’s right, I’m about to drop the people’s snellbow on you. Blake Snell’s ERA is 2.24, but his FIP is 3.44. As we all know, or should know, FIP is a better indicator of a pitcher’s actual performance. These numbers suggest that there is some regression to come. In redraft leagues I’d strongly consider selling high, but in keeper leagues, even with the looming regression he’s quickly becoming a valuable starting pitcher with ace potential. If you can get a good offer, I’d still consider snelling high. Trevor Bauer resents this opening paragraph.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Billy Ray Butler isn’t nicknamed “Country Breakfast” because he likes to eat his early morning meal outdoors. Currently a free agent, the 2012 All-Star is perhaps coming to the realization that his professional career might be over. “Moving onward” said Butler in a recent interview with designatedeaters.com when discussing his newest business venture that is literally beginning to explode. Approaching three bills on the scale, Billy knew he had to make some changes. But change is never easy, especially when said change interferes with one’s daily responsibility of stuffing one’s face. “But why eat less when you don’t have to. What if you could still eat as much as you want and still lose weight,” remarked Butler who was indeed looking like he was down to about two fifty. Billy’s latest craze, known as Fartio, promotes eating as much as you can. It stresses foods loaded with beans. Mexican meals are an excellent example. Other flatulence inducing foods such as chicken with broccoli, corned beef and cabbage and sausage and peppers are near the top of the list. The objective of Fartio is to head directly to one of Billy’s studios and jump on the treadmill, spin bike or elliptical and fart off those calories. “The place smells like the men’s room at Yankee Stadium during the seventh inning stretch, but it’s worth it,” said Matt Albers whose eating spiraled out of control after losing the closing gig in Milwaukee when Knebel went down earlier this season. All machines are equipped with barf bags for those overcome by the stench of rotting intestines. Pablo Sandoval credits his weight loss to Fartio. Many thought Butler’s venture would lay an egg, but instead his brand is being franchised across the country by ex-ballplayers such as Prince Fielder and Mo Vaughn. Rich Garces has taken the idea one step further and has an onsite Venezuelan restaurant run by his family. Needless to day, Billy Butler is blasting his way to a better body one fart at a time. If you struggle with weight gain perhaps Fartio can work for you too. To give it a try, call 888-4-FARTIO. And don’t forget Billy’s mantra “you can’t outrun a fart on a treadmill”…

Please, blog, may I have some more?

I would like to take this opportunity (highjack the opening paragraph of this post) to rant about Bryce Harper’s current All-Star vote total. At the moment, a phrase I’ve chosen instead of “currently”, Harper is second in voting for National League Outfielders. With approximately a little more than one million votes, he is not far behind Nick Markakis. Allow me to remind you that just a few weeks ago I referred to Markakis as the current points league MVP. Given his draft position, or lack thereof considering he as undrafted in most leagues, I stand by that comment. It’s not the players you draft in the first two rounds that win you the championship. They are supposed to be superstars. In reality they have a better chance of helping you lose the championship by not living up to their draft status. An early round flub can put you in a serious hole. This concept is a bit more pronounced in fantasy football where rosters are smaller and losing your first round running back can pretty much doom your entire season. It’s undrafted players like Nick Markakis, whom I’ve been patting on the back in points leagues since I started writing for Razzball, that give you the boosts you need to win your league.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

I’ve been telling anyone that will listen not to be concerned about Paul’s slow start. In fact around the end of week 8, he might have been the best buy low candidate in years. Seriously. Coming into the season many were stricken with fear over the installation of a humidor in Arizona which was followed up by a pitiful start. I can’t tell you how many questions I’ve gotten in the last couple of weeks about trades people were considering in which they traded him away. Paul Goldschmidt is a stud. I could have just written that today and been done with the Paul Goldschmidt blurb, but that wouldn’t have satisfied my need to give the man a big ole bear hug. As I said two weeks ago, and repeated last week, “Excluding an injury shorted 2014 in which he was on pace for over 500 points he hasn’t scored less than 500 since 2013“. Last week Goldschmidt led all batters with 58 points. He went 16 for 25 with five singles, six doubles, a triple, four home runs and eleven RBIs.

Let see who else had a strong week eleven.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Coming into this season Yu Darvish owners had a lot to be excited about with his off season signing with the Chicago Cubs. With the Cubs potent offense averaging 5.07 runs per game in 2017 and Darvish’s career 3.41 ERA coming into this year, he was set to get all the run support he’d need to prosper. Unfortunately even with a career K/9 of 11.04, Darvish’s 2018 season has been a disappointment. Even though he’s still striking out at least 11 batters per nine, he’s only averaging 9.38 points per start over his eight starts. For comparison, Miles Mikolas is averaging 19.09 points per start. Darvish is currently on the disabled list with inflammation in his right triceps which I’m sure owners are hoping will explain his less than stellar start to 2018. In the meantime, let’s take a look at some other players that are not living up to our preseason expectations.

I’m going to go out on a short limb (think Jim Abbott) and say that if you were able to exit this year’s draft with the following starting lineup that you’d be awfully excited for the coming season.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Warning, this post has no consistent theme. When I sat down and began thinking about what to write I really couldn’t focus on a single concept, so instead the result is a hodgepodge of points league material. If I was going to talk about Eric Hosmer who has a measly 114 points I could borrow the term hodgepadre from a much better writer. But if I’m being honest, I couldn’t give a shit about Hosmer as his 0.51 points per plate appearance. While we’re discussing Padres let’s spend a sentence or two on Christian Villanueva and his 14 home runs. Despite leading all rookies in dingers, Villanueva also has 51 strikeout in 156 at bats. That’s an impressive (unimpressive?) strikeout rate. Ignoring my recent post about not penalizing a batter for a strikeout, this is not good in points leagues. This is why he only has 97 points and is still on the wire is over twenty-five percent of points leagues.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Batters that are consistent week after week are much more enjoyable to have on your roster than those with frequent hot and cold spells. Sure a player putting up 50 points in a week can almost single handedly earn you a win, but the three weeks prior where he didn’t break single digits can be extremely frustrating. Especially when such a cold spell leads you to bench said player on the week he finally breaks out for 50 points. As Grey would say “sonofabench”. Byron Buxton punched me in the nuts with one of those last year. In years past Jay Bruce is a hitter that often fell into this category.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Those that have been reading my points league posts since I started with Razzball a few years back know that I dislike batters that strikeout a lot. I’ve been a vocal supporter of penalizing batters for strikeouts. I have even gone as far to say that if you are in a points league that does not subtract points for strikeouts that you should find another league. In points leagues strikeouts cost you points. Anything that costs you points is a poison. Take a player like Khris Davis. Last year he had about 399 fantasy points, finishing just inside the top 50 batters. Davis struck out 195 times. In leagues that penalize one point for a strikeout, that’s 195 points he lost. That’s as many points as Alex Gordon had in all of last year. Chris Davis with a “C”, had 190 points. Like Khris Davis with a “K”, he also had 195 points deducted for strikeouts.

Please, blog, may I have some more?
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