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Yogi Berra

“YOGI”

When he was in his late teens, Lawrence Berra, or Lawdie, as he was called by his friends and family, went to the movies, and saw a film with an Indian fakir and a yogi; his friends thought that he was the spitting image of the yogi. The nickname caught on immediately.

Berra’s family lived on “The Hill”, or as it was sometimes affectionately called, Dago Hill, an Italian neighborhood in St. Louis, renowned for its superior cuisine, bocce performers and soccer athletes. Baseball was frowned on as a useless endeavor. This, of course, didn’t discourage Yogi and his pals, including Joey Garagiola, from sneaking out of school and playing ball.

On one occasion, St. Louis Cardinal GM Branch Ricky came by in order to observe some of the local boys perform. He was quite impressed with Garagiola, offering Joe a $500.00 bonus in order to sign a contract to play ball for the Cards. He then offered Yogi a $250 bonus. Berra, who realized that he was the far-more skilled player than his friend, reluctantly turned it down. Rickey, who later stated that Berra, due to his ungainly body, would never amount to more then a Triple A player, adamantly refused to increase the offer.

Now, most baseball scholars would agree that Branch was perhaps the best judge of baseball skills in the history of the game. He had literally discovered scores of Hall of Fame talent in his long career; Jackie Robinson and Roberto Clemente are only two of a very long list. What’s more, Rickey had been a catcher himself. One needs to ask at this point – how did he make this incredible error of judgment? He certainly had seen many players, especially catchers, with peculiar body types, become stars in the Major Leagues.* But there is a converse theory. Was Ricky attempting to pull off a complicated ruse? There is some circumstantial evidence that seems to give credence to this idea. Rickey knew that his time with the Cardinals would soon be coming to an end; his plan was to join the Brooklyn Dodgers front office.  Was his real intention to “hide” Berra until he made the move? If not, why did he make an offer of the same amount of cash – $500.00, a short while after moving to his new post of GM of the Bums, an offer that was made only a hairbreadth after Berra had signed a contract with the Yankees; an amount that Rickey was so intractable about spending a short while previously? Rickey was known to keep prodigious files on players that he was interested in. If he thought that Yogi was nothing more then Minor League fodder, why did he keep his file on Berra? Later on, Branch Rickey would state that Berra and Campy were two of the greatest catchers in the history of baseball, and that Berra was the greatest clutch hitter he had ever seen.

Berra made his debut with the Yankees at the tail end of the 1946 season, after serving two years in the US Navy (Berra was involved in top secret duty in a rocket boat involved in the invasion of Normandy Beach). He hit a home run his second time at bat. Many years later, Joe DiMaggio commented on the blast:

“I will never forget this; he hit a pitch, a ball so far out of the strike zone. Not only was it a ball, I don’t think that I could have hit it. I mean hit it, not out of the park like he did. I mean that, I couldn’t have put my bat on the ball.”

The next season, the Yankees won the pennant, and then beat the Dodgers in the World Series 4-3. This was the first of 10 World Series rings that Berra was to win in his active career as a ball player, a major league record. However, the Dodgers stole 7 bases off of Yogi, humiliating him behind the plate. In 1948, the Yankees hired Casey Stengel. The Stengel/Berra alliance was to be the most successful manager/player duo in the history of baseball. Soon, Casey would begin referring to Yogi as “Mr. Berra, my Assistant Manager”, or as “My man.” Casey would often state that he hated to go into a game without “My Man” behind the plate.

In 1949, former Hall of Fame Yankee catcher Bill Dickey was brought in to assist Yogi in improving his catching technique, and how to best utilize the “tools of ignorance.” As Berra later put it, “Dickey learned me all of his experience.” 1949 began what was to be the greatest dynasty in the history of baseball. The Yankees won five successive pennants and World Series titles between 1949-’53, a feat that has never been duplicated. They had an even better season then the prior five in 1954, but that was the year of the great Cleveland Indian team which won 111 games. The glue, or rather the cornerstone, that held together those great teams was Berra. Those years marked the decline of DiMaggio as a great player, and Mantle was just starting to make his mark. In 1950, perhaps his greatest season, Yogi’s vital statistics were .322/28/124.  Starting in 1950, Berra had an incredible seven year run that has never been duplicated by any catcher in ML history. During those 7 years, Yogi won 3 MVP awards; during that period he also finished 2nd twice, 3rd once and 4th once in the voting. By the time his playing career ended in 1963, and the dust had settled, Yogi placed in the top ten in the AL 9 X’s in RBI’s, SLG %, and HR, 6X’s in Runs Created, 7 X’s in TB, 7X’s in Extra Base Hits, 5 X’s in OBP + SLG, and appeared in 15 All Star appearances.  Berra led the Bronx Bombers in RBI’s for 7 straight seasons, something that Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio, and Mantle never duplicated. As a catcher, he made a record 148 games without error. Without a doubt, an awesome resume.

Yogi was named VP of Yoo-Hoo Soft Drink in ’56. When asked if it was hyphenated, he replied, “No ma’am, it’s not even carbonated.

However, despite having the most recognized nickname on the planet, Yogi’s talents as a ballplayer are strangely unappreciated. ESPN Sports Analyst Jason Stark, in his book “The Stark Truth” concerning overrated and underrated ballplayers, states that in his opinion, Berra is the most underrated ballplayer in major league history. The reason for this is not hard to fathom. Yogi has become a cartoon caricature; first, there was the animated cartoon, Yogi Bear, then the development of a minor industry based on Yogi-isms, and more recently, the AFLAC commercials; of course, Yogi has played along with this perception, and by doing so, has done well for himself financially, and has become a household name, but he is perceived more as an inscrutable buffoon rather then the peerless catcher; perhaps the most intelligent backstop of the 20th century, Casey’s “Assistant Manager.”

“Why has our pitching been so great? Our catcher that’s why. He looks cumbersome but he’s quick as a cat.” – Casey Stengel

“…some things we lump under the heading of intangibles might simply be things we have not yet found a way to quantify – or which do exist and which can’t be quantified.” – Allan Barra

As Yogi might put it, if there were such a thing as intangibles, he would have discovered them. But there is no doubt that Berra was uniquely gifted in working with pitchers, passing on experience to what Casey called the “Youth of America”, clutch hitting, having leadership qualities, and being a positive influence in the clubhouse. But there is something beyond all that; a thing that it is impossible to quantify, that defies belief, but is nevertheless the truth – where ever Yogi went, baseball magic occurred. Yogi was in many ways the Forrest Gump of Baseball. Almost without fail, magical, miraculous events occurring on the baseball diamond between 1947 and afterwards, when he retired from the game always seemed to have Berra associated in some capacity. Yogi or the teams that he played with, managed, or coached were involved in more incredible plays and memorable games then any other individual in the history of the game. No one else is even close. Hitting a home run in his first Major League game. Bill Bevins losing first a no-hitter, and then the game to the Dodgers in the World Series when Cookie Lavagetto hits a double with two outs. Don Larsen’s perfect game. Allie Reynolds’s two no-hitters; the second one, where Yogi blew the last out, a pop-foul off the bat of Ted Williams; then Williams proceeding to hit another pop-foul – this one caught by Berra. Hitting the first pinch hit home run in a World Series game. The controversial steal of home by Jackie Robinson in the ’55 World Series, the only Series ever won by the Bums of Brooklyn. Two home runs blasts off of MVP Don Newcombe, as well as a total of ten RBI’s in the ’56 World Series. The Bill Mazeroski Home Run in the 7th game of the 1960 World Series, giving the Pirates the win over the Yankees. The Miracle Mets of ’69. Manager of the 1972 Mets “You Gotta Believe” Squad. Berra comes back to coach the Yankees in ’76; they win their first pennant since ’64, and then win back-to-back World Series victories over the Dodgers. Of course, the day Yogi and George Steinbrenner reconciled (due to Kaiser George firing Berra after managing a mere 16 games in 1964), and George honoring him with “Yogi Berra Day at Yankee Stadium, David Cone pitching a perfect game. And that is just a very small sample…

He’d fall in a sewer and come up with a gold watch.” – Casey Stengel

So either Yogi Berra is the luckiest man who ever stepped on a baseball diamond, or he is the possessor of gifts that currently remain beyond our ken. It is up to you, gentle reader, to decide.

*Bill James, in Baseball Historical Abstract, does an interesting analysis of what he describes as the “Hack Wilson” body type – basically short, squat, with a low center of gravity, and not very graceful – and states that this type seems to be disproportionately successful in baseball.  Perhaps, a short, powerful physique is actually the best body-type for a baseball player. Roy Campanella, Kirby Puckett, Smoky Burgess, Roger Bresnahan, Ducky Medwick, and Tim Raines – all of these great players are of this type.  If you were to look at them, you would never at first glance picture any of them as The Natural. Yogi is, of course, the most famous, and thus the prototype, of this particular body type. No one who first laid eyes on him ever thought that he was even a ballplayer. At least not until they saw him with a bat.

45 Responses

  1. Dead Heads says:
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    Simply awesome. Thanks Paulie

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @Dead Heads: Much appreciated, thanks!

  2. Simply Fred

    simply fred says:
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    ‘… if there were such a thing as intangibles, he would have discovered them…’

    simply magical!

    Gonna have to change the dog’s name from Jeter to Yogi!!

  3. Boomer19 says:
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    Awesome. One of my favorites. Thanks.

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @Boomer19: You are most welcome!

  4. costaricanchata says:
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    @ Paulie :

    By FAR , your best work , to date .
    A completely enjoyable read .

    My only criticism is the “awkwardness” of
    the Allan Barra quote .
    (Who the heck is Allan Barra ?)

    Count me among your fans .
    I eagerly look forward to your next effort .

    • steve b says:
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      great stuff,@costaricanchata: allen barra wrote a book with and about yogi a couple years ago called ‘Yogi Berra eternal yankee” It was a very good read

      • costaricanchata says:
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        @steve b:

        thanks .

        • Paulie Allnuts

          Paulie Allnuts says:
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          @costaricanchata: My greatest pleasure is to please the Razzball audience of baseball aficionados.

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @costaricanchata: Thanks much! Allan Barra did a biography of Yogi. His last name is not a misspelling but a coincidence; he is not related.

  5. Big Al says:
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    I grew up in Northern New Jersey. When I was in 7th grade my friend Dave talked me into helping him deliver News papers. We did it sitting on the back of a station wagon tailgate down holding on to handles as we drove long. He thru lefty and I was the righty. Imagine doing that now ? I was Yogi Berra’s paper boy for a year. He live on a good size lot in Glen Ridge NJ. His house was huge like a Southern Mansion with big white pillars. They would drop me off at one side of his driveway and drive around the block. I would run down Yogi’s driveway drop off the paper and meet them on the other side. I got to meet Yogi one New year’s morning. It was probably 5 AM. As I ran up to his door Yogi, Phil Ruzzuto, Moose Skowron, and covered in snow in a snowbank is my hero. Mickey Mantle. I come running up and Yogi asks who the hell are you ?. I stop dead in my tracks, and say I’m the paperboy. Mantle try’s to stand up and falls back into the snowbank. There all laughing now and Yogi helps Mantle get to his feet. I say is that Mickey Mantle? And Yogi says no that’s Mr. Mantle. Mantle is laughing and reaches into his pocket and takes out a roll of cash and gives me a $50 dollar bill and says Happy New Year kid !!!. And they all stagger up and in to Yogi’s house. I get back to the other end of the driveway and Bill the guy who drives the car is asking me what took so long. I just looked at him and said you’d never believe it if I told you. Yogi and Phil Ruzzuto own a lot of business interest around where we lived. Met him again down in Ft. Lauderdale Florida in spring training after a game. Me and my dad got to chat with him. He remembered that morning and we had a good laugh about it. Those guys were our hero’s growing up, and we all loved them. They were bigger than life , and full of life. It’s really amazing the stats Yogi put up. Now in fanasty leagues you punt the catcher position and pick them late in a draft because none of them stand out stat wise. Hope I didn’t bore you ,but you dug up a great memory for me.

    • costaricanchata says:
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      @Big Al:

      great story , Big Al .

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @Big Al: That is a fantastic story! A paper boy’s dream!

      • Big Al says:
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        @Paulie Allnuts: Hey Paulie !!! Do me a favor. Write a story about Mickey Mantle sometime. One of his quotes I use all the time ” If I knew I was gonna live this long, I would have taken better care of myself “

    • Simply Fred

      simply fred says:
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      @Big Al: Fantastic story! If I show up on your doorstep next New Year’s with a newspaper can I get YOUR autograph!! Every boy’s dream!!!
      Thanks for sharing!!!!
      Paulie can be pretty inspiring…:-)

    • Spammer Jay says:
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      @Big Al: awesome story. your lucky to grow up in that era.

    • AL KOHOLIC says:
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      @Big Al: awesome story,one to cherrish, Thanks for sharing And Paulie this is a masterpiece

      • Paulie Allnuts

        Paulie Allnuts says:
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        @AL KOHOLIC: Thanks again, Kelly!

    • tomscuba says:
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      @Big Al: Nice story bro.

      • Paulie Allnuts

        Paulie Allnuts says:
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        @tomscuba: Thanks!

  6. BitchesBeShoppach says:
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    Fantastic read. Good stuff!

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @BitchesBeShoppach: Mucho Appreciado, or something like that :)

  7. steve b says:
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    love this kinda stuff

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @steve b: Always more in the hopper! Thanks!

  8. Al koholic says:
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    now the season is feeling like its starting with our 1st Paulie post,and a great one at that,thanks for all the hard work my man,keepem coming

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @Al koholic: Kelly, yes, the season has officially begun! Catchers and pitchers in camp, and my first post of the year.

  9. MattTruss223 says:
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    10 RINGS!! I didn’t know that little tidbit, that’s amazing!

    Gotta agree, this is one of your best pieces Paulie, hard to top the Rube Waddell post though ;)

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @MattTruss223: Rube remains my favorite ballplayer of all time, so he was easy to write about. Between Yogi and Rube, you can write forever. So many stories, different types of zaniness.

  10. George Lutes says:
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    Paulie,
    Thanks for yet another gem!
    Keep up the good work.

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @George Lutes: Thank you George! Will do my best to keep the stories rolling in!

  11. The Guru

    The Guru says:
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    Good to have you back, Paulie. Well done. Bring on the baseball!

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @The Guru: Amen to that, Guru!

  12. Old BB Fan says:
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    My first post. Thank you Paulie and thank you Big Al. The recent passing of our childhood stars , particularly in the NY-NJ area ( Ralph Kiner, Jerry Coleman)reminds us how fleeting life is. However, the memories stay forever.

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @Old BB Fan: We will certainly miss Ralph and Jerry, both war heroes as well as great baseball players and announcers. Yogi is NJ’s own treasure, pray for his health.

  13. Lou-Dogg says:
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    What a totally unexpected treat. Its like I went out to get my morning paper, and there was a gently used basketball there too. Just for me. Thanks. I had NO IDEA Berra was such a great player. I looked at that stat line you gave (28 hr, 130ish rbi) and thought, “how much would I have to pay for that at my auction?” Kudos.

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @Lou-Dogg: Yogi broke the mold in many ways; there is one other barrier he might have broken – Grey would have recommended a catcher as a first round pick in your fantasy draft. Thanks!

  14. Wallpaper Paterson says:
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    Nice article, but one correction to be made. The Mets team Berra took to the World Series was the 1973 one.

  15. tomscuba says:
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    Always get excited when I see you put up a post. This one didn’t dissapoint. Thanks brother.

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @tomscuba: You are most welcome. Glad you enjoyed the post.

  16. Wake Up says:
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    Very nice! Always enjoy these odes to the history of the game.

    • Paulie Allnuts

      Paulie Allnuts says:
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      @Wake Up: More are certainly in the hopper and on the way! thanks Wake up!

      • Paulie Allnuts

        Paulie Allnuts says:
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        @Paulie Allnuts: And good luck in the mighty ECFBL!

Comments are closed.