Grey threw this knuckleball: “I have an idea for someone who wants extra credit on their Razzball exam.  Put together, next year, a team of 27-year-olds.  My guess is if you don’t research anything else and only draft 27-year-olds, you’ll have a leg up on the competition.”

Fun, yes! A ‘leg up’…on the pool of ALL other ages? Is he serious or just having fun with us? I’ll play along… cull all those ‘lucky-year’ studs.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Did a little fishing. Here’s what I hooked. Arrayed all 576 RCL teams from last year, sorted by each pitching category, assigned a rank, 1 to 576 (just like your RCL league, 1 to 12) then totaled the ranks for the five cats. The result was a ranking from top to bottom for the best pitching managers.

The #1 ranked manager produced (followed by the average for each cat):

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Oh, sure, there was a pretender to the title. That guy who pointed to the stands and delivered HIS home run.  But, hey, it was just ONE prediction.  Sure, a bunch of you can make one prediction.  One projection.  But I, Simply Fred, thought we should put the pundits to the test.  Please, blog, may I have some more?

Please, blog, may I have some more?

This was author and innovator Lou Poulas’ introduction last year, “While Grey and Rudy do a great job of breaking down everything you need to know for 2011 fantasy baseball, drafts still trip me up.  I’ve been lamenting my inadequacies from the past 3+ years which resulted in an inordinate amount of time number crunching in Excel.  Please, blog, may I have some more?

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Yeah, you—the one looking at me in your rearview mirror.  I’m talking to YOU.  Well, actually, I want to LISTEN to YOU!  Am interested in the trade secrets that helped you to make the big, bold, and successful moves that helped you to climb the ranks mid-to-late season.  Please, blog, may I have some more?

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Thought I’d take a look at a random fellow RCL manager’s draft and in-season moves to see if we could learn anything that may help us improve our own management skills.  First, a look at DRAFT DAY.  These are the SIX player positions (of the TOP TEN picks) that are still left on his team from draft day:

1 Infielder (Weren’t we supposed to target more than one on draft day?)

1 OF (Round 9; got to have at least one from Pujols, Braun, Kemp, Holliday, don’t we?)

2 SP (Isn’t pitching much more fragile than hitting?)

2 RP (SAGNOF; wow, Round 6 and Round 8; wouldn’t they have been better off with another infielder and outfielder?)

Is it possible that this team is dead last, given that they only have TWO POSITION PLAYERS left from their top ten picks on draft day?  Please, blog, may I have some more?

Please, blog, may I have some more?

In prepping for 2010 fantasy baseball draft day, I read that one wants/needs reliability at the top of the draft. Got me to thinking about which players and teams have the best records for durability. I selected any player that had 150 GP for any one season from 2006 through 2009, four years. Please, blog, may I have some more?

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Armed with the knowledge that Our Greyness is not infallible (Grey’s ‘Pertise), I was determined to prove that the computer could, well, out-predict him.  After all, the man makes split-second calls on “please put these in order,” “who is best for the rest of the year?”, “in a twelve-team, keeper, with SLG and OBP in place of AVG and HR, place in order …,” and, simply, “of these pitchers who should I start/sit tomorrow?” Surely, given all of the data available and the crunching ability of The Whopper, the machine could out-perform him on, say, at least the “who should start/sit tomorrow issue.” Without a doubt. Please, blog, may I have some more?

Please, blog, may I have some more?