The short answer is: It’s made some of us very rich.

As someone (in some small capacity) involved in the online fantasy baseball industry, it is impossible to ignore the massive changes over the past couple years due to the rise of daily fantasy baseball.

Before “The Rise” it seemed like fantasy baseball was losing, a little bit more each year, a portion of its casual participants. This undoubtedly put a strain on people trying to make a living by doling out fantasy advice. Also the fact that even people who avidly consumed fantasy baseball content were reluctant to ever pay for it only added to the problem.

(Kudos to Grey by the way for doing a good job of catering to the casual player and creating an atmosphere where people are also happy to throw a few bucks his way.)

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Last article, I introduced pulling your league’s data from Yahoo’s API in a Python script. Today, I’m going to show you a better way to do that very same thing.

In my last article dkempiners’ python-yahooapi code was used to do the heavy lifting, but admittedly I didn’t have a great understanding of how it worked and it was clunky in ways. This week we’re going to use josuebrunel’s myql code base, which at least for me was cleaner to use and easier to understand.

Since it seemed like more than a few people tried to follow along and do it themselves last week, this article will simply show how to use it, but won’t go anywhere near a step-by-step level of detail. Some coding knowledge is expected, in other words. If you have questions, I’ll do my best to answer them.

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My first piece of advice to you is: Don’t do this…

Alright, now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, and seeing as how I have done this, let’s discuss. First off, you might be curious what access to the API gives you. You might even be curious what exactly an API is (still not sure). Or maybe you’re just wondering if that attractive co-worker of yours has ever hooked up with anyone in the office (she has).

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Note: We’ve got real baseball games being played and I’m stuck in this theoretical auction world. If you’re not prepared to dive into coding and stat minutiae, maybe save your energies for my article next week. Fair warning…

If you were with us last time, I introduced a program that simulated an auction given a list of the participants, a list of the players to be bid on, and lists of how much each owner valued each player. The reason I built this program was to learn more about auction strategy. The issue with my program was, even though it simulated auctions well enough, it was hard to glean any meaningful information from the results.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Or, the Unexpected Virtue of Active Bidding…

Unlike a certain appendage of mine, I like to keep my intros short, so let’s get down to business. For those of you who were not with us last week, I spewed some thoughts on auction theory and expressed a desire to create a tool to simulate auctions. Seven days later, I have created such a tool. Or at least a basic, yet functional form of one…

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Imagine you are given a perfect list of auction values. Like you walk to the top of Mt. Sinai and instead of the Ten Commandments, God hands you a sheet of perfect dollar values for your upcoming auction. (Relative to burning bushes and other ways God has made his “presence known”, I’d say this would rank about middle of the pack in terms of directness). What would you do with these values?

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Hello readers of the Razz! It’s been a long winter and I have some strange ideas floating around my mind, so I’d like to start things off with a little guessing game.

If I have your permission, I’d like to presuppose that at one point in your fantasy baseball career, probably near the start, you had a dream that you were better than everyone else at predicting player performance. Maybe not for every single  player but you at least had a few players, your guys, who you thought would have a big year. It was based on only hunches, but you were a confident, naive little soul.

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Man, I have not watched a Braves game in a frog’s leap, but lemme tell you, Freddie Freeman takes batting seriously. It is no joke when he steps to the plate. First off, Too Close by Alex Clare is his walkup song. Not a bad choice to set a  dramatic tone. What happens is Freeman enters the batter box, takes a quick glance back at the catcher and umpire, as if he’s making sure they’re still there. Then he swivels his head around ever-so-slowly until it faces the pitcher directly, coming to a dramatic stop. After a quick smirk like he knows something you don’t, he assumes his batting stance and awaits to clobber the heck out of whatever you’re about to throw. Since breaking out big in 2012, Freeman has mostly repeated those numbers this year, albeit with a small amount of regression involved. Without an injury history to speak of, Freeman’s the kind of high-floor player that may not be able to win your league outright, but won’t prevent you from winning either.

Please, blog, may I have some more?