For those that are new here, welcome.  I’ve gone over my fantasy baseball draft strategy previously.  Luckily for you, I will happily coddle you.  Unluckily for you, I think coddle means to fart on your pillow when you’re out of the room, causing you to get pink eye.  For all your previous misguided attempts at drafting in fantasy baseball leagues, you might be SMDH or telling yourself FML, but now you will be SMDH like, “Look at me smiling like I just smoked some reefer and shaking my damn head at my new knowledge of fantasy baseball drafts.”  Or you might be telling yourself FML, but now you mean it like, “I just got my life drunk on a case of Pabst and we’re going to screw for the first time real romantic-like.  Could someone light a candle while I eff my life?”  Fantasy baseball strategies are as old as the earth, if the earth were ten or so years old.  There’s a LIMA Plan (Low Investment Mound Aces) by Ron Shandler.  There was a ZIMA Plan by Matthew Berry; it involved a lot of stumbling around, groping and the hiccups. There’s been a Punt One Category draft strategy.  There’s been a Punt Two Categories draft strategy, which was conceived by a leaguemate of Punt One Category who just couldn’t stand being upstaged, and there’s the Forget When Your Draft Is So Your Team Is Autodrafted strategy.  I love when my leaguemates use that one.  Then there’s my fantasy baseball snake draft strategy, Fantasy Master Lothario’s Strategic Method of Domination Henceforth or FML SMDH. (You might even want to use this strategy for our Razzball leagues.  Join now.  Thank you.)

FML SMDH has five basic steps.  If you follow these steps, you will place near the top in all of your leagues.  No plan is foolproof because, unfortunately, they still have to play the games, but FML SMDH puts you in the best position possible to win coming out of your draft.  Actually, this plan is foolproof and you should ignore the previous sentence that said no plan is foolproof.  No sentence is foolproof, that’s more accurate.  Okay, onto the steps:

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I’m Buzzkill Aldrin this preseason, huh?  Just call me Killjoy McAvoy!  Don’t hate the player, hate the game, or in this case, watch as I hate players that play the game.  First, I call Miguel Sano overrated, and now the other supremely hyped 2nd year guy, Kyle Schwarber.  I may as well just say Carlos Correa has gout and call it a day.  You know, not a lot of ‘perts would call Sano and Schwarber overrated, so if nothing else I’m getting an A in Balls.  Potentially, an F in Smarts.  But maybe I’ll get a C in Being Aware of My Lack of Smarts, which gives me a C overall and passes me through to the next grade.  I’m not getting placed in any AP classes next year though.  I’m hanging out the window with my grade A Balls and letting everyone know that I have a problem where everyone else has none.  At first, I was shocked that so many people were on board with Sano and Schwarber, but, once I saw everyone was on board, it was only natural that every everyone was on board.  I mean, what is fantasy prognosticating without repeating back to you exactly what everyone else is saying, right?  This is one of ESPN’s rare qualities.  Everyone says Kyle Schwarber is good?  Great, he’s good; now, let’s move on so we can get out of here by lunch.  Member that time they did a video of their rankings summit?  Ten minutes of Cockcroft rolling his eyes, five minutes of Karabell getting his makeup touched up, fifteen minutes of Berry hitting on Karabell, thinking he was a girl.  Good times!  I understand the urge to be positive on Schwarber.  He hits the ball a long way.  He is exciting.  But, alas…. Anyway, what makes Kyle Schwarber overrated for 2016 fantasy baseball?

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If it’s sexy to talk about Miguel Sano, and it is, then there’s one way to make it unsexy like Ruffles you find in your butt crack the next day and become the lone dissenting voice in the sea of fantasy baseball ‘perts.  That is coming out against drafting him.  I feel like the guy that opts for sorbet at the ice cream place because dairy upsets his tummy, then holds up the line asking why they don’t make any dairy-free flavors using coconut milk.  I’m that guy!  I wouldn’t be surprised if saying Miguel Sano is overrated gets me stoned, and not the good stoned like Coco Crisp looks before every game.  It is a really unpopular opinion.  I can understand it.  Sano hits bombs.  Like unprecedented, roof-shattering bombs.  His bombs are adjective-inducing and his strikeouts are agita-inducing.  Which one will win out?  That’s all this post comes down to.  Here’s what I said in the top 5 Designated Hitters, “For each blurb, I zero in one stat.  Sometimes I balloon out to other stats if it’s needed.  For Sano, I went straight to his 35.5% strikeout percentage.  Since 2000, only one player had a 35.5% or higher strikeout percentage over a full season, Chris Carter in 2013 who hit .223 that year.  Sesame Street breakdown:  When you’re striking out more than a third of the time, you can’t hit for a good average.  This was brought to you by the letter K.  Last year, Sano hit .269.  Do you know how Sano hit for such a high average?  He had a .396 BABIP.  For those that don’t understand or care to know BABIP, I’ll make it simple.  Everything Sano hit last year found a hole or a bleacher seat.  A high BABIP either means a hitter was lucky, they’re fast or hit the ball hard.  Sano is not fast, he was lucky and hit the ball hard.  Since he hits the ball so hard, he could have a higher than average BABIP, but .396 isn’t higher than average, it’s obscene.  He could’ve easily hit .190 last year.  No one seems to be talking about this.  I Googled “Sano strikeout percentage” and found a Bleacher Report article titled, Miguel Sano is Great and Here’s a Slideshow to Prove It.  I then Googled “Miguel Sano” “Strikeout Percentage,” and I found two articles and one was written by me in 2014.  Not even joking.  Then, I opened up my search to “Sano strikeouts” and I found lots of results.  I don’t mention this because it’s my only Google history I can talk about.  I’m talking about it because no one else is.  Sano is a bad luck streak away from hitting .175 in the majors.  Sano connected with only 33.8% of pitches outside of the strike zone.  One player in the last 15 years has been that bad, Wily Mo Pena.  Last year, Melvin Upton connected with 41.2%.  Previously, Upton connected with 55.3% of pitches outside the zone in his career.  Sano makes Melvin Upton’s wild swing look like he studied under Charley Lau.  Sano isn’t just bad with pitches outside the strike zone.  He’s historically bad.  It took me five minutes to figure this out.  How long do you think it’s going to take major league pitchers and Sano never sees another strike?  Say Opening Day?  I’m not sure how Steamer is projecting Sano for a .255 average.  Sano hit .236 in Double-A!”  And that’s me quoting me!  Anyway, what can we expect from Miguel Sano for 2016 fantasy baseball and what makes him overrated?

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How many Pollocks does it take to hit 20 homers, steal 39 bases and bat .315?  200 billion Pollocks.  One, A.J. Pollock, to hit, and 199,999,999,999 Pollocks to run real fast to make the earth spin.  Pollock’s year in fifteen-after-twenty couldn’t have went any better.  On our Player Rater, he was the 2nd best outfielder behind Bryce Harper and in front of Mike Trout.  Yes, that Mike Trout.  The fish oiliest of them all.  If you owned Pollock last year, you are a Serbian who purchased a Polish person at a flea market or you are a fantasy baseballer that enjoyed one of the best seasons of recent memory.  Either way, you’d be more than happy with the Pollock’s output.  Value-wise, things couldn’t have been much better.  When I called him a sleeper last year, I foresaw great things, but even I couldn’t have imagined greatness that hadn’t been achieved by a Pollock since Ivan Putski.  That’s why it’s real sucky that we’re not all drafting for 2015 again.  Think of the advantage we’d have knowing what players would do!  (Sadly, if we got together today and drafted a 12-team league for last year, eleven of us would still lose.  Talk about depressing.  Even more depressing, all twelve people drafting would think they’d win easily.)  This is one of the biggest mistakes people make each year.  Forget Aaron Hicks or Adam Eaton, let’s all draft guys that were good last year.  I mean, how wrong can we go with that?  Honestly, you won’t go that wrong, but you won’t go that right either.  It’s a good way to find yourself right to the middle of your league with Malcolm and Monie Love.  Anyway, what can we expect from A.J. Pollock for 2016 fantasy baseball and what makes him overrated?

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I have no idea if anyone at ESPN actually ranks people.  There’s talk of it.  Like, “Yo, Clara Bell, you do your rankings yet?”  Then Cockcroft makes farting noises with his armpit.  However, all I ever see is consensus rankings.  I have to figure out how to do this “consensus” thing.  Talk about a nice way to avoid taking any blame for anything.  “Hey, man, sorry about Andrew McCutchen being ranked so high this year, but these are ‘consensus’ rankings.”  Let’s turn to a conversation between two random fantasy baseballers.  “Cockcroft has said he doesn’t like Cano this year.”  “But ESPN has him 36th overall.”  “Yeah, doesn’t apply when talking about Cockcroft.”  “So, when does it apply?”  “No idea.” Then heads explode.  Consensus rankings are done by committee.  Only thing ever done better by committee is jerk seasoning.  Now, while you might think ESPN’s rankings have a ton of jerk seasoning, they are just an indecipherable mess.  But why bring up all of this when I’m about to take a blowtorch to Yahoo’s 2016 fantasy baseball rankings?  Thanks for asking, clunky expositional question!  Yahoo has consensus rankings, but they also show their work.  Each ‘pert is accounted for in their rankings.  This is already much better than ESPN.  You can at least see what Pianowski, Funston, Behrens and Triple D are thinking individually.  This, of course, doesn’t mean I agree with all of their rankings, but at least I can point to how they came to their consensus.  Anyway, here’s where my 2016 fantasy baseball rankings differ from the 2016 Yahoo fantasy baseball rankings:

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Our 2016 Razzball Commenters Leagues are in full signup mode.  I even heard there were a few people from Anonymous that signed up!  They said, “To the world, I’m anonymous, just another white man who sits in parking lots with binoculars watching women.”  Man, that Anonymous guy is depressing!  As we always do about this time, I eviscerate the haters and complicators!  I eviscerate the not-knowers and the over-knowers!  I eviscerate the ESPN goers and the garden hoers!  I overuse a word like eviscerate that I just learned!  I am the Fantasy Master Lothario (don’t abbreviate it) and I’ve come for your children.  See, because blog writing doesn’t pay so well, I’m taking a second job as a bus driver, so I’m here for your kids.  Like a baller!  A shot caller!  A “I’m outside of Hot Topic at the maller!”  My eviscerating (I’m conjugating my new word!) today comes at the expense of ESPN and their 2016 fantasy baseball rankings.  To the tune of Kendrick Lamar’s Bitch, Don’t Kill My Vibe.

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So the title is a bit of a superlative.  What was I gonna say, “The Mostly Kinda Good Fantasy Baseball Team?”  You’ll get over your scoffing, I have faith in you.  This is the best 2016 fantasy baseball team that I can put together when drafting from my top 100 for 2016 fantasy baseball and top 500 for 2016 fantasy baseball.  Honestly, I could draft another 25 teams from those lists, and they’d all be different, but equally terrific… Well, one of the twenty-five would only be sorta terrific, but it would be really hard to tell which one that is.  If I took Carlos Correa in the 1st round, everything after would change.  If I took Arenado in the 1st round, everything after would change.  I’ve previously gone over my 2016 fantasy baseball draft prep for the first few rounds and pitchers pairings.  For this exercise, I’m taking Mike Trout first, because, well, I have him first overall.  Until pick 100, I’m taking one guy somewhere in every fifteen picks.  It would be nice if I was in a league where someone drafted Arrieta and Kershaw in the first two rounds and I was able to take Anthony Rizzo in the 2nd round (which is possible), but since Trout and him are in my first 10 picks, according to the rules I’ve set up for myself, I can’t take them both.  Then, as we all know, once you get into the 100s, there’s wide gaps between ADP and where players are actually taken.  People tend to look at team need over value.  So for this exercise, once I get to pick #101, I’m going to pick two players every twenty picks.  Finally, because there is so much latitude in the last 300, I gave myself free reign to fill up my team.  Throughout the draft, I also gave myself the ability to reach to a lower draft pick, but not reach forward.  Or reach around, if you’re feeling frisky.  It should still be my ideal team… Or not.  Let’s see, shall we?  Bee tee dubya, this team is 5×5, one catcher, 5 OFs, MI, CI, 1 UT, 9 P, 3 bench, just like the Razzball Commenter Leagues (Go sign up or start a league).  Anyway, here’s the best 2016 fantasy baseball team:

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Here’s a post that’s gonna make you wanna slap ya mama and tell her Don Magic Juan sends his best.  The other day I told you how to draft your pitchers for 2016 fantasy baseball.  I laid it out to you nice and simple (if you have a degree in “What The Hell Is Grey Talking About?” Not a PhD, mind you.  Just a BS.)  Today, we forget all that jabberwocky on the who-ha and get down to business old school-style (which means if you don’t comprehend, I will hit you over the head with a baseball bat signed by Joe Clark.)  What I’m hoping to lay out to you is who do you draft 2nd if you’ve drafted so and so first.  I think it might be helpful to go through pairings for your 5 outfielders, all your middle and corner infielders too.  I’m not sure I’ll have the time or patience to do them.  We’ll see!  Or not.  Your choice.  (Actually, my choice.)  For easy reference, the royal we will be using the top 10 for 2016 fantasy baseball and the top 20 for 2016 fantasy baseball and the beginning of the top 100 for 2016 fantasy baseball. I’m going to assume you’re in a 12 team, 5×5, MI, CI, 5 OF, 1 Utility, 1 Catcher league, similar to our Razzball Commenter Leagues. (Go join one now. Or join two.  Or three.)  Anyway, here’s some pairings for the first two rounds of 2016 fantasy baseball drafts:

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For these pitcher pairings, I’m going to be using our (my) 2016 fantasy baseball rankings.  Notably, the top 20 starters for 2016 fantasy baseball, top 40 starters for 2016, top 60 starters for 2016 and the top 80 starters for 2016.  You can also just go to our Fantasy Baseball War Room.  Okay, formalities out of the way.  *rolls up sleeves, makes farting noise with hand under armpit, rolls down sleeve*   Let’s get busy!  Now, what is a pitcher pairing?  It’s your plan for putting together a fantasy staff.  A course of action.  If you have A pitcher, which B, C, D, E and F pitcher goes with him?  Which is different than ‘F this pitcher,’ that’s what you say in May.  You should have six starters.  The sixth starter is Aaron Sanchez or take whoever you want.  I suggest an upside pick.  Sanchez comes to mind.  Or Vincent Velasquez.  Daniel Norris also comes to mind.  I’m going to assume you’re in a 12 team, 5×5 and some variation of 9 pitcher leagues like the Razzball Commenter Leagues.  Speaking of which, the RCL league signups began on Monday, go sign up for a league. (NOTE: What you are about to read is massively confusing.  If it were found scribbled in a notebook, the FBI would be watching me.  If Charles Manson stood up and read this at the next prison Meet N’ Greet, no one would blink an eye.)  Anyway, here’s pitcher pairings for pitching staffs for 2016 fantasy baseball drafts:

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By the title, I’m referring to the return of the Fantasy Baseball War Room.  I’m not saying the Fantasy Baseball War Room is back, as in, is a butt.  So, if Sir Mix-A-Lot is reading, I’m truly sorry for the confusion.  Our Fantasy Baseball War Room is one part draft tool, one part fantasy team evaluator, one part fantasy junkie’s s’s and g’s tool, one part holy, two parts smokes, three parts… How many parts is that so far?  Cause it’s only really seven parts total.  I think there’s one part kill-your-day-with-this-war-room-thing-a-maboob in there too.  After you’re done signing up for a Razzball Commenter League (oh, just sign up already!), this is the next step.  Practice with building a team.

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