Don't be shellfish...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+

Organizational Talent Rankings via Baseball America
2012 (28) | 2011 (29) | 2010 (8) | 2009 (2) | 2008 (14)

2012 Affiliate Records
MLB:  [69-93] NL East
AAA:  [73-67] Pacific Coast League — New Orleans
AA:  [70-70] Southern League — Jacksonville
A+:  [74-62] Florida State League — Jupiter
A:  [80-59] South Atlantic League — Greensboro
A(ss):  [44-13] New York-Penn League — Jamestown (Batavia beginning 2013)

Arizona Fall League PlayersPhoenix Dessert Dogs
Michael Brady (RHP); Grant Dayton (LHP); Brian Flyn (LHP); Scott McGough (RHP); Jake Realmuto (C); Kyle Jensen (OF); Christian Yelich (OF)

Graduated Prospects of Note
Jacob Turner (RHP), Matt Dominguez* (3B);  Scott Cousins (OF)

*Now with Houston

The Run Down
While Miami fans cannot be pleased with the Marlins’ roster moves at the big league level, it’s tough to ignore the club’s improvement in the minor leagues.  Not only did system talent like Christian Yelich and Jose Fernandez explode with breakout years, but the organization added necessary depth via trades with Detroit and St. Louis.  Featuring two elite-level prospects, and a handful of others who bring decent upside, there’s plenty of intrigue here for fantasy purposes.  The Marlins have a new opening at manager, and considering the wave of talent that will surface within the next two years, it might not be such a bad gig.  Maybe.  Just watch what you say about communist dictators.  

Top Ten Prospects
1.  Jose Fernandez, RHP:
  Fernandez broke out in 2012, posting a 1.75 ERA, a 0.93 WHIP, and a 10.6 K/9 between Low-A and High-A.  The 20-year-old has legitimate ace-potential, and should find himself in the top-15 on most prospect lists this offseason.  For a closer look, check out this Scouting the Unknown post, which I wrote back in August.   ETA:  2014

2. Christian Yelich, OF:  Yelich is among the purest hitters in the minors — in the same class as guys like Oscar Taveras and Wil Myers.  He’ll be a top-20 prospect on most lists this offseason, but if he continues to rake at the upper levels, he’ll find himself in the top-10 by this time next year.  In 447 PA at High-A in 2012, the 20-year-old hit .330/.404/.519 with 12 homers and 20 stolen bases.  More on Yelich hereETA:  2014

3. Andrew Heaney, LHP:  I wrote a brief report on Heaney as part of my draft preview back in June.  That was back when the 21-year-old lefty was wrapping up his career at Oklahoma State, waiting to learn where he’d fall in the draft.  Miami ended up taking him 9th overall and inked him with a bonus worth $2.6 million — a very last-minute deal.  The Marlins started him in instructional league, bumping him up to Low-A for the final month.  Heaney struggled with command during his first taste of pro ball, but his stuff was solid and he still managed a K/9 at 10.0.  Look for a better all-around numbers in 2013.  ETA:  Late 2014

4.  Marcell Ozuna, OF:  Ozuna is regarded as one of the streakier hitters in Minor League Baseball, and I doubt that changes much as he moves through the upper levels.  With an aggressive approach, plus raw power, and the ability to crush lefties, he has a skillset that’s conducive to streakiness.  But that’s not necessarily a killer in the fantasy game — that might be something you’d want to avoid in H2H formats, but Ozuna is a guy who could hit 25+ homers in the bigs.  The power will come with a .250ish average, but it’s certainly not worthless.  ETA:  2014

5.  Zack Cox, 3B:  Cox came to Miami via St. Louis as compensation for Edward Mujica.  Highly touted after a nice year in 2011, the 23-year-old fell off track in 2012 at Triple-A in the Cardinals system.  The Marlins bumped him down to Double-A after the trade, but Cox’s struggles continued.  He ended the year with a line at .254/.301/.409 with 10 HR and 43 RBI.  Miami sees Cox as a viable option in 2013, but he’ll need to prove 2012 was a fluke before he gets the call.  ETA:  Late 2013

6.  Adam Conley, LHP:  At 6-3, 185, Conley generates mid-90s velocity with a fastball that features good, late movement.  Secondary offerings are holding him back, however.  Conley started strong in 2012 at Low-A, but struggled after promotion to High-A.  There’s still time for the 22-year-old to round out his repertoire as a starter, but if he doesn’t do so soon, he’ll shift to bullpen work.  ETA:  2014

7.  Jesus Solorzano, OF:  At 22, Solorzano is pretty old to have not yet reached full-season ball.  After hitting .314/.374/.519 in the New York-Penn League, however, folks are optimistic that the toolsy Venezuelan can push through the next stages quickly.  Plus speed and decent pop will make him an intriguing prospect if he continues to hit.  ETA:  2015

8.  J.T. Realmuto, C:  A converted shortstop, Realmuto has surprising athleticism for a catcher.  At Low-A in 2011, he offered a bit of everything at the plate, including a .287 AVG, 12 homers, and 13 steals, and though he regressed in 2012 at High-A, some of the troubles can be attributed to the pitcher-friendly Florida State League.  I’m hopeful for better output in 2013.  ETA:  2014

9.  Rob Brantly, C:  Brantly arrived in Miami by way of Detroit along with Jacob Turner in the Anibal Sanchez deal.  After making the switch from the International League to the Pacific Coast League, the 23-year-old was impressive, earning a call-up in August.  He continued to hit in the bigs, posting a .290/.372/.460 line through 113 PA.  The Marlins will consider their options at catcher for 2013, but Brantly will be one of them.  ETA:  2013

10.  Avery Romero, SS:  Romero isn’t rangy enough to stick at shortstop, but his bat is good, and that alone should be enough to carry him through the system.  The 19-year-old reached short-season A-ball in 2012, and will likely make his full-season debut before turning 20.  ETA:  2015

10 Responses

  1. Larry says:
    (link)

    Where would AJ Ramos fall on this list?

    • Scott Evans

      Scott Evans says:
      (link)

      @Larry, He’d be a fringy top-15 guy. Sweet slider, but fastball tends to stay straight & that can be problematic for someone who doesn’t work in the upper 90s. If fastball improves, he could be a useful, high-leverage type — that’d be worthy of a spot in this top-10, but still much to prove.

  2. dave says:
    (link)

    what kind of numbers to think Brantly will put up in 2013?

    • Scott Evans

      Scott Evans says:
      (link)

      @dave, Something like .275/.325/.400 — I don’t see him matching his big league line from 2012, but I also don’t see him being awful either.

  3. murph says:
    (link)

    Has Chad James fallen off the prospect radar? Where would he rank?

    • Scott Evans

      Scott Evans says:
      (link)

      @murph, His second stint at High-A was worse than his first go at it. Scouts say his stuff is still quite good, but 1.64 WHIP & shrinking K-rate are causes for concern. Even so, Miami’s depth thins after this top-10, so James still falls somewhere in the next 5. Still has good upside if he can ever harness his stuff.

  4. Vacation says:
    (link)

    Scott, thanks for these. Really enjoyed your prospect podcast.

    • Scott Evans

      Scott Evans says:
      (link)

      @Vacation, Thanks for reading!

  5. Pete says:
    (link)

    What about Barnes and Keys

    • Scott Evans

      Scott Evans says:
      (link)

      Both are fringy prospects for now. They handle the bat well, but neither has a ceiling worthy of this top ten, especially after the additions of Marisnick & Nicolino. Best case for Keys seems like a 4th outfielder. For Barnes, if he can continue to hit & not fall too far behind defensively, he could work his way into a regular role at 2B.

Comments are closed.